The Missing Souls


Great garage/mod revival band from Lyon, France. These guys’n gal really dig 60’s garage the right way. On their 2016. debut slab and singles all songs are covers of tunes from Pebbles/Back From The Grave/Girls In Garage kinda comps, done in a real cool and refreshing style & sound. They are one of the best garage revival gang I heard lately. They’re FABULOUS, believe you me! Soon I’ll post collection of 60’s originals they covered, until then Check ’em out!




Everything You Always Wanted To Know


Hmmm… You certenly know something ’bout 60’s instros but this Arf! collection gathered some real wyld & weird sides. That means fuzzz, feedback, backmasking, acid and other psychedelic effects to warp your mind. Comparing to ”Buzz Buzz Buzzzzzz” instro comps, this one is more on psych/lounge side ’67-’69 stuff. Anyways there are some ’66 ”b-sides” as feedback drenched Oxford Circle”Mind Destruction”, Vaqueros ”69”, Dantes ‘’80-06”, The Executioners ”I Want The Rain”… Question Mark [& Mysterians] ”Hang In” is actually instro cover of The Squires “Going All The Way” but my favorite trax are The Mussies ”12 O’clock, July” a great garage-fuzz rip-off the Link Wray’s ”Jack the Ripper”, fuzzed-out ”Ballot Bachs” by The Shades, psychedelizied Pinocchio & His Puppets ”Fusion”, The American Dream ”Tioga”, Front Office ”Wow” it’s really Wah-Wah alright! Then  Hal Blaine ”Love In (December)”, The Arrows [Davie Allan] ‘‘Make Love Not War” and three cuts from ”Astro-Sounds: From Beyond the Year 2000” Lp by 101 Strings.

All trax were transferred from original records and rare 45’s so I have to do some cleaning that means… Sound check by Mr.Eliminator [himself] = Real Cool. Dig!!!





The California Poppy Pickers were one of several relatively anonymous studio projects assembled by Alshire label head Al Sherman to record budget-priced copycat LPs of ’60’s pop hits. Virtually all of the groups in question — Fats and the Chessmen, Los Norte Americanos, and the Bakersfield Five, among them — were helmed by producer and songwriter Gary Paxton, best-known for composing the novelty smash “The Monster Mash.” In 1965, Paxton founded his own Hollywood recording studio, assembling a session crew and the group released three 1969 LPs — Sounds of ’69, Hair/Aquarius, and Today’s Chart Busters comprised primarily of covers and thinly-veiled rewrites. [Jason Ankeny, All Music Guide]




‘Sounds of ’69’ is solid exploito album with some cool fuzz instros as Bun Buster, Happy Organ, Do Ya, Do Ya and Wipe Out ’69 [included in Surfadelic “The Hell Surfers” soundtrack] and unfortunately few lame shitty vocal tunes as horrible cover of Blowin’ In The Wind and Why Don’t We Do It In The Road.




The Projection Company lp is another 60’s exploatation slab that includes involvement of famous studio musician Jerry Cole and his crew. Some songs featured on this album are alternate versions of tracks found on his project “The inner sound of the ID” originally recorded for RCA records [Boil The Kettle, Wild Times, Don’t Think Twice]. Here you got some fine psych/lounge  instrumental trax as Kimeaa, Our Man Hendrix, Tune Out Of Place, What Else





Surfadelic Presents: THE HELL SURFERS !!!

The Hell Surfers-1


…Kinda like a “Hells Angels on surfboards” or “Surfin’ Angels on Hellboards” or… whatever. Anyways it’s another Surfadelic production, a soundtrack for secret Tarantino/Rodriguez movie project that never existed. So it shoulda be fuzzed-out instro action, mean mutha that’ll leave you brathless. Gathered here are some of Surfadelic alltime favs from 60’s biker and other rare exploatation lps as well from surfin’/hot rod field. You gotta check those evil muthas yourself. As Blues [Peter Fonda] once said “Oh no, Preach, not children of God – but Hells Angels”. Hoka hey! Dig!!!


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The Hell Surfers-3

They’re Coming to Take You Away, Ha-Ha!



Songs The LYRES Taught Us [60’s Garage]



I’ve planned this for a long time and now here is a big fat 72 trax collection of songs covered by garage rock heroes the Lyres. As you know Jeff ‘Mono Man’ Conolly is a big fan of 60’s garage/beat especially The Kinks, The Pretty Things, The Sonics, The Standells, Chocolate Watch Band, 13th Floor Elevators, Flamin’ Groovies, The Stooges, Dutch band The Outsiders as well as some obscure ”Pebbles/Back from the grave” kinda stuff. Lyres have that rare ability kinda ‘magic’ to make others tunes sound as their own [somethin’ like The Cramps or Ramones]. Most songs in this collection are from 60’s but there are some R&B/Roll from 50’s and two trax from late 70’s Boston garage-punk acts. Almost every song they covered on their studio albums and live recordings is here, sometime in 2 versions. So, if you’re a fan of Lyres and 60’s garage/beat you should check these Mono Man favorites. Dig !!!

[Special thanx for info to whitetrashsoul.blogspot]



JOHNNY CARROLL – Texabilly [1978]

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“This 18-track collection brings together Johnny Carroll’s entire output for collector Ronny Weiser’s Rollin’ Rock label, recorded between 1974 and 1977. Chronologically beginning with the tribute tip of the hat on “Gene Vincent Rock” from 1974 (although it’s not sequenced that way on the disc), featuring original Fabulous Thunderbirds drummer Mike Buck, the bulk of this disc comprises the entire 1997 Texabilly album. This minor classic of the idiom was cut in Weiser’s living room in one marathon 27-hour session and featured fellow Texan rocker Ray Campi on slappin’ string bass. Carroll’s voice is full of the same sore-throated hollering power that he possessed in his 1950s prime, and his guitar work is funky in tone and simplistic in derivation. The big surprise is the preponderance of original material, most of it coming from Carroll’s pen, with “Who’s to Say,” “Is It Easy to Be Easy,” “Her Throbbing Lips,” and “Whatcha Gonna Do?” being particular standouts. The 1970s were barren years for the original rockers, and the rockabilly revival hadn’t built up a full head of steam yet, but these recordings helped to show that there was still plenty of energy left in the genre and one of its original practitioners.” [Cub Koda]

More rockabilly action at Surfadelic. By the way, did you know that ‘People In Texas Like To Dance’, well they do alright! Dig!!!


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CHARLIE FEATHERS – Charlie Feathers / Honky Tonk Man & New Jungle Fever [1987-90]

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Allright folks, more Charlie’s ‘Feathersbilly’ is on the way. These late 80’s recordings are pretty solid R-Billy/Country stuff, especially self titled ’91 lp, but you gotta check it out yourself. Dig!!!

”S/t Lp recorded in 1990 and produced by Ben Vaughn, features Feathers doing a number of his own truly eccentric and brilliant songs accompanied by former Sun Studios musicians guitarist Roland James, drummer James Van Eaton, and bassist Stan Kesler, and an alternate rhythm section on a few other cuts provided by bassist Terry Bailey and drummer (as well as cardboard-box percussionist) Perry York. Of the Feathers “classics” that appear here are “Pardon Me Mister,” “A Man in Love,” “A Long Time Ago,” and a rewrite of “I Can’t Remember to Forget,” dedicated to Presley, who first cut the song as “We Can’t Seem to Remember to Forget.” Other material includes rockabilly nuggets like “Fraulein,” “Mean Woman Blues,” “Uh Huh Honey,” and Stan Kesler’s true gem, “You’re Right, I’m Left, She’s Gone.” Instrumentation aside — all the playing here is expert, authentic, and full of raw immediacy — it’s Feathers’ voice that is the spark and spook of these proceedings. He is a man haunted by the past eternally, trying to make it a renewable present, and offering the truth in how forgotten it all is in his delivery (check out “Defrost Your Heart,” in which Feathers moans, growls, does the hillbilly wail, and sings a blues that is truly unearthly in that same way that Hank Williams and Roscoe Holcomb’s are). Feathers died in the late ’90s, but he leaves behind an enduring testament to his particular brilliance as a frighteningly intense singer and canny songwriter. This album is near the pinnacle of that legacy.” [Thom Jurek]


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“I could talk about Charlie Feathers ’til I’m blue in the face, but there is no way to explain his greatness. He is completely unique. You have to hear him to get the picture.
In the 50s, he was one of the people who invented and defined Rock’n’Roll. In the 80s, he’s still inventing and defining it. He seems to have only gotten stranger and more perverse through the years. He baby-talks, chirps, hiccups, moans, and gasps his way through a song, ’til it becomes a little separate world all it’s own.
His version of “Roll Over Beethoven” is so full of menacing weirdness, it sounds like a song you never heard before.
Charlie is a crazy magician and he knows all the tricks. But don’t take my word for it. Buy this record.” – Lux Interior




”Depending on who you ask, Charlie Feathers was either one of the great stylists of rockabilly or one of the true raving lunatics of the genre, and of course the qualities which inspired these judgments were in no way mutually exclusive. While Feathers’ voice was capable of gracefully recreating all the trademark swoops, gulps and wails of classic rockabilly, he refused to be hemmed in by the conventions of the style; he could sing straight country in a manner that would make George Jones cry with envy, or he could let loose with guttural blues moaning that was positively lascivious — and he would sometimes do a bit of both while making his way through something like “Working on a Building,” as he does on this two EP’s cut in the 1980s. Both Honky Tonk Man and New Jungle Fever were obviously recorded quickly on a low budget, and the production and accompaniment on these tracks leaves a great deal to be desired, but Feathers wails like a man possessed from front to back on this collection, even if he does sound as if he may have enjoyed a few too many cocktails as he throws shouts, squeals and whoops right and left like a boxer raining blows on a target he can’t quite see. This material doesn’t show Feathers at the top of his game, but despite the reduced circumstances of his career, these tracks find him full of fire and sonically unrepentant. His full-on covers of “Honky Tonk Man,” “Blue Suede Shoes” and “He’ll Have to Go” (the latter sounding like the weirdest pick-up line ever set to music) and gotta-hear-’em-to-believe-’em originals like “Jungle Fever” and “Who Da Say” were crafted by some sort of mutant visionary, and this is the work of a great lunatic stylist if there ever was such a thing.” [Mark Deming]


charlie-feathers-honky-tonk-man-2-cdCharlie Feathers - Honky Tonk 1charlie-feathers-last-call-cd


CHARLIE FEATHERS – Jungle Fever / Uh Huh Honey [Hiccup Rockabilly Legend]

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“I’m a tip-top daddy and I’m gonna have my way
Keep away from the corners is what I got to say
With a-one hand only, get a-ready for a ride
Give me one hand loose and I’ll be satisfied”

“Charlie grew up in rural North Mississippi and was taught guitar by his friend, Junior Kimbrough, before heading off to nearby Memphis in 1950 with a view to making it in the music business. He should have been massive, being one of Sam Phillips‘ first white signing to Sun Records, writing some great songs and having (arguably) an even better ‘stage’ name than Elvis Presley, who he soon be-friended. Sadly, it was not to be, as even though he recorded regularly for Sun and other labels such as Meteor, Kay, King and more, a mix of bad luck, poor decision-making and an impatient personality all contributed to a life among the also-rans and nearly-men. The notes to this set suggest that it may also have been that, despite his instinctive and natural feel for rockabilly, his distinctive ‘hiccupy’ vocal delivery was too pure for mass consumption”

Give me a free hand baby, ’cause I wanna rock
Turn me loose and maybe I will blow my top
Give me a free hand woman, let it swing by my side
Just give me one hand loose and I’ll be satisfied
Turn loose! Oh, turn loose!”

Charlie Feathers - Jungle Fever 2

“I can’t hardly stand it
You’re troublin’ me
I can’t hardly stand
It just can’t be…”

His name is most frequently associated with the classics that regularly appear on the best rockabilly compilations – Tongue-Tied Jill, Everybody’s Lovin’ My Baby, Bottle To The BabyOne Hand Loose, Get With It and, of course, Can’t Hardly Stand It [made famous by Born Bad, Songs We Taught The Cramps comps.]

Jungle Fever” LP is essential collection of Charlie’s 50’s R-billy and country rock stuff and it’s a must have. “Uh Huh Honey” thought not so important comp. as ‘Fever’ brings together all of his late-’60s recordings for the Memphis-based Philwood label, along with some fascinating live TV recordings from 1978. has some real cool trax as The Wild Side Of Life, Do You Know, Rain (Where’s She at Tonight), Long Time Ago, and others. Classic uncontrolled Feathersbilly. Great rockabilly from a true legend!

“Well, it’s rain-rain-rain it keeps on falling
Upon my window pane tonight
Though our love is even colder
Still wonder where she’s at tonight…”


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“Well, feel the rhythm in your bones and you know how I feel
But don’t you grab me close baby, this time is for real
Get ready for some rockin’, pick ’em up and put ’em down
Give me one hand loose and I’ll be satisfied”


Charlie Feathers _1_002

Tip Top Daddy – The Ultimate Rockabilly God!

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