FLAMIN’ GROOVIES – Groovies’ Greatest Grooves

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“Groovies’ Greatest Grooves is a 1989 compilation album by U.S. rock band the Flamin’ Groovies, originally released by Sire Records. The tracks were selected by Rolling Stone Senior Writer Michael Goldberg and freelance rock critic Michael Snyder, who also co-wrote the liner notes. Goldberg and Snyder wanted to emphasize the Groovies’ original material, and so 18 of the album’s 24 songs are Groovies originals. It also collected tracks from throughout the group’s career, and showcased their versatility and changing styles throughout the years. Having said that, it draws heavily from their three Sire Records albums, with 20 of the 24 songs from those records. (The exceptions are “Teenage Head”, from the 1971 album of the same name, the two 1972 UA singles “Slow Death” and “Tallahassee Lassie”, compiled on A Bucket of Brains, and the 1981 Gold Star Studios recording of “River Deep, Mountain High”.)” wiki

Listen up folks! If ya ain’t got any of Groovies’ three Sire rec. albums by now you just ain’t livin’.  This fine comp gathers songs mostly from their “power pop” period with Chris Wilson. 24 trax + 9 bonus cuts added for a good measure is a real cool deal, allright! Dig!!!

 

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THE PLIMSOULS – One Night In America / Beach Town Confidential

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”At a time when rock music was shifting gears, the Plimsouls threw British Invasion into the new wave mix and permanently altered the genre. Fun was the operative word, and bar bands everywhere joined the fray. But the Plimsouls were exceptional because they boasted the talents of singer/songwriter Peter Case.

The band formed in Los Angeles in 1978 and merged roots, retro and guitar rock with a ramshackle punk aesthetic. Case had already collaborated with Jack Lee and Paul Collins in the Nerves, who had some success in 1976 with the single “Hangin’ on the Telephone,” later recorded by Blondie. In 1978, Case met L.A. locals guitarist Eddie Munoz, drummer Lou Ramirez and bassist Dave Pahoa. After one EP, Zero Hour in 1980, and an album in 1981 that contained some stellar power-pop in songs like “Zero Hour” and “Hush, Hush,” it looked like the band were a new wave one-off until a single from the soundtrack to Valley Girl, “A Million Miles Away,” lifted them from new wave obscurity and cemented their reputation. The song remains a timeless classic. An album for Geffen, Everywhere At Once, followed in 1983 with a re-recorded version of the song, but ultimately, the liaison with the label was not a lasting one; the Plimsouls broke up shortly after its release. A testament to their strength as a live band was captured on One Night in America and released in 1988.” [Denise Sullivan]

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“LA’s short-lived but glorious run of The Plimsouls is documented by this loud and proud, high energy concert recording, made in 1981 and left in a bag in guitarist Eddie Munoz’s closet. It runs through 13 songs, mainly from the band’s Planet Records’ debut album, four covers and an early version of The Plimsoul’s signature “A Million Miles Away.”

“One Night In America” captures the band’s unique mix of progressive punk and power pop in a tight, sometimes messy, energetic performance. Featuring classic tunes such as ‘A Million Miles Away’ and ‘How Long Will It Take’, the band also included a few covers such as The Kinks’ ‘Come On Now’ and The Outsiders’ ‘Time Won’t Let Me’, here in all their raw, live glory.”

 

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“Beach Town Confidential” captures a stunning live performance by power-pop purveyors The Plimsouls at the band’s pinnacle, during the summer of 1983. Recorded at the now-defunct Golden Bear in Huntington Beach, Calif., the incendiary 17-song set finds the foursome charging through a particularly inspired set of hook-filled originals and some smartly-chosen covers.

Led by the passionately soulful vocals of Peter Case and the slashing, melodic guitar work of Eddie Munoz (complemented by a tight rhythm section in bassist Dave Pahoa and drummer Lou Ramirez), “Beach City Confidential” offers the best sound of any Plimsouls live recording that has surfaced to date. (It was produced and mixed by Case from the 24-track masters.) In addition, the set list provides a fine overview of the band’s best-known originals from their two full-length albums (including the alternative radio biggie “A Million Miles Away,” “Zero Hour,” “Now” and “Oldest Story in the World”), alongside some rarities (such as the smoldering surf instrumental “Hobo,” which was originally released as a B-side).

As powerful as the originals are here – and the readings of “Oldest Story in the World” and “How Long Will it Take” positively smolder – the band’s choice of covers is where Beach City Confidential really shines. Many of these have never appeared on any Plimsouls release until now; Moby Grape’s “Fall On You” and the Creation’s “Making Time” are particularly well-suited to the Plimsouls’ sound, and the band amps ‘em up a bit, throws ‘em into overdrive and makes them their own. Versions of the Everly Brothers’ “Price of Love” (with guest vocals by the Williams Brothers) and the Flamin’ Groovies’ “Jumpin’ in the Night” (with Keith Streng of the Fleshtones sitting in on guitar) are also quite fine, and showcase the Plimsouls’ love of ‘60s pop and classic power pop,respectively.” [Goldmine]

 

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JOHNNY THUNDERS – Belfast Rocks

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This is actually Johnny Thunders & Cosa Nostra (Johnny Thunders, Terry Chimes & Keith Yon) live set from Ireland 27. October 1984. 19 tracks, lots of humor & some surprisingly compassionate comments on the Irish Troubles.  Very good quality.  3 of the 19 tracks are different versions of Chinese Rock, leading one to believe that Thunders may have had ADD in addition to all of his other infamous maladies.

 

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JOHNNY THUNDERS & THE HEARTBREAKERS – Vive Le Revolution!!

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”Never the most prolific studio visitor, the late New York Dolls guitarist Johnny Thunders plied his brand of bent-string dementia where it shone brightest: live, and in your face, with no premium on timing, or tuning. Such carping about those factors is wasted on Thunders fans, who cared more about their hero’s screw-you persona, than whatever physical condition he brought to each performance. This album drives that object lesson home once more, being culled from the Heartbreakers’ 1977 tour promoting their ill-fated L.A.M.F. album, which saw powerhouse drummer Jerry Nolan quit over its mixing. The set list is the same that’ll appear on future live releases, but the performance is vicious enough to overlook such considerations. All the standbys are here, including “Chinese Rocks,” one of the most graphic snapshots of heroin addiction ever written, as well as the English putdown “London Boys,” and Thunders’ laconic self-assessment “Born to Lose.” Heartbreakers fans also get an obscure, unissued original in the Bo Diddley-style swagger of “Baby Talk,” the obscure A-side “One Track Mind,” and “Take a Chance With Me,” so the recycling isn’t as shameless as the track listing seems. Second guitarist Walter Lure and bassist Billy Rath provide their usual bullish support. Former Clash refugee Terry Chimes isn’t nearly as flashy as Nolan, but keeps the beat rolling with a damaged panache. As always, Thunders’ vocals and guitar waver all over the place, but his cut ‘n’ thrust bluster gets over on sheer persistence. What frequently sounded stilted on vinyl suddenly makes sense onstage, where the band could unleash its feral fury without worrying about recording levels. For Thunders, the attitude mattered most of all, and there’s plenty for Heartbreakers fans to absorb here. You’ll either like this release or hate it…but, in punk rock, that’s often a compliment.” ~ Ralph Heibutzki, All Music Guide

Great live set recorded at Paris Bataclan in 1977.

 

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JOHNNY THUNDERS – M.I.A. (Surfadelic Collection)

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Here’s brand new Surfadelic collection dedicated to one of my alltime guitar heroes J.T. As ya know there are loads of Johnny’s collections out there, some are great, some are weak so I decided to gather his rare & lesser know studio recordings and demos from 1979, 1982 & 1990 from various sources and put ’em in one place just fer your listening pleasure. Most of these songs never found a place on the proper studio album which is shame. Some of the tunes feature colaborations with acts as The Chesterfield Kings, Jerry Nolan and Wayne Kramer and the Gang War. Who Do Voodoo, Countdown Love, Help The Homeless, Hey Thanks, King Of The Gypsies… Cool stuff indeed. Don’t miss it, dig!!!

 

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JOHNNY THUNDERS – So Alonesome [1978. Unreleased studio recordings]

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Between January and June 1978 Johnny enrolled producer Steve Lillywhite and recorded a wealth of material which contributed to his first solo album ‘So Alone’. To celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the album Johnny self proclaimed as the best album he ever made, Remarquable Records is releasing a special companion to add further insight to that creative period and showcase a bedevilled artist supported by an unrepeatable cast of friends and musicians which allowed Johnny more time and more control in the studio than he ever had in his truncated life. Consisting of previously unreleased studio recordings ‘So Alonesome’ is an essential sibling to ‘So Alone’. Featured msuicians include Steve Jones & Paul Cook (Sex Pistols); Peter Perrett & Mike Kellie (The Only Ones); Paul Gray & Steve Nicol (Eddie & The Hot Rods); Walter Lure & Billy Rath (Heartbreakers); Phil Lynott (Thin Lizzy); Steve Marriott (Small Faces/Humble Pie); John ‘Irish’ Earle (Thin Lizzy); Chris Wood (Traffic); Chrissie Hynde (Pretenders) & Patti Palladin (Snatch).

Pressed on 180 gram limited edition vinyl, these are alternate mixes of legendary ’78. “So Alone” LP with pretty superior sound to orginal mixes. THIS IS A MUST !!! Vinyl Rip, Dig!!!

 

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JOHNNY THUNDERS & THE HEARTBREAKERS – Down To Kill

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Yooo punkerz! It’s pretty hot these days and it’s gonna be hotter with this set of The Hearbreakers ’76 demos & live recordings. You’re already familiar with the L.A.M.F. ‘never ending story’, so disc 1 ‘Raw & Rare’ brings you Staten Island unreleased studio recordings of some of your favorite Heartbreakers tunes and rare stuff featuring Walter Lure and Richard Hell. Disc 2 contains the complete remixed “Speakeasy” live recordings. The Speakeasy show was recorded while L.A.M.F. was being recorded (March 1977) and really captures the Heartbreakers at their peak. This stuff is essential for every Thunders/Heartbreakers fan. So punks… say… dig!!!

 

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Keith Mansfield, Alan Hawkshaw, Johnny Pearson – The Big Beat / Speed And Excitemen [KPM Scores 1968-1970]

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More TV shows & film music scores produced by the British KPM company. Excellent library music from the legendary KPM label with lots of fuzz guitar and organ in addition to the famous drum breaks. Funky primo library music. Two of the best KPM albums + ’68 bonus. Say… Dig!!!

 

 

MUSIC FOR TV DINNERS – The 60’s

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Music for TV Dinners is a compilation of music composed by artists working for KPM, a British firm that developed a niche for providing music scores for commercial and industrial films during the 1950’s and 1960’s. 

“These sixteen production library compositions, used variously in educational shorts, commercials, television shows and feature films, constitute some of the most invisible, yet best remembered, musical melodies in American culture. Even stranger is that most of this music was produced by the British KPM company. Further examples (including EMI and Pye’s contributions to the canon) can be found on UK anthologies such as “The Sound Gallery” and “The Sound Spectrum.” The collected composers and arrangers construct brilliantly memorable productions whose purpose is to serve as musical beds beneath narration or to signal mood and plot shifts in films and television programs.

Though not designed as firmly for the background as true Muzak [tm], there is still an unnerving contextual shift in compiling these tracks for foreground listening. Though originally used in more subliminal contexts, these tunes have been drawn on in recent years as a simple way to evoke nostalgic moods, with or without irony in mind. In addition to appearances on boomer throwbacks like Nick at Night and Ren & Stimpy, these titles also appear in films like “The Hudsucker Proxy” and “Natural Born Killers.” The most recognizable tune (at least, for 1960’s television viewers) will be Wilfred Burns’ “Stop Gap,” which served as the theme to “Truth or Consequences.” You can’t help but feel that Bob Barker will step out in front of the curtain at any moment.

As calculated as this music may be, its composition, arrangement and performance hold tremendous charms. This is more mood music than easy listening, in that its purpose is to attract your attention and shape your experience, rather than provide any sort of sedation. Many of the musical cues will haunt you with inscrutably faint memories of products like Vaseline Intensive Care Lotion and Midol. This is an excellent volume for listening or for adding unique musical cues to your home video.”

“For, ahem, more mature listeners such as myself, the tunes will absolutely remind you of your childhood shopping trips to Sears/JC Penneys to buy school clothes, and of the game shows on the old black-and-white teevee. The tunes are perfect for vacuuming/ironing/washing dishes to.”

“Better Title: Music For Happy Shoppers!”
“Wrap my World in Foil and Heat It Up”
“Yeah, Baby, Yeah!”

 

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