KFWB’s Battle Of The Surfing Bands [1963]

KFWB's Battle Of The Surfing Bands! 1

KFWB was (and still is) a Los Angeles based radio station. This ’63 DEL-FI compilation lp features some popular r&b & surf instrumentals of that time by some well known acts as The Lively Ones, The Sentinals, The Impacts, Bruce Johnston, Dave Myers and others. Get it!

01 Bruce Johnston – Surf Party
02 The Lively Ones – Surf Battle [Goofy Foot]
03 The Sentinals – Vesuvius
04 Jim Waller And The Deltas – Surfin’ Tragedy
05 The Rhythm Kings – Soul Surfin’
06 Dave Myers And The Surftones – Driftin’
07 The Soul Kings – Get It
08 The Impacts – Tor-Chula
09 Dave Myers And The Surftones – White Water
10 The Challengers – Ramrod
11 The Biscaynes – Revellion
12 The Charades – Delano Soul Beat


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WAX, BOARD AND WOODIE !

WAX,BOARD AND WOODIE

Subtitled “a collection of rare and unreleased surf and hot rod songs,” this 14-track compilation hits the intended target in a big way. Culling its contents primarily from the MCA/Dot Records vaults, one of the big tickets here is a bone-chilling unreleased moment when we hear the Surfaris attempting to take on the Rolling Stones with their swipe at “Route 66,” way cooler than it sounds. A couple of silly but great fun anyway P.F. Sloan sides, including a unreleased sloppy-as-hell song demo, compliment one-off instrumentals like “El Gato” by the Chandelles and “Tremble” by the Galaxies. And in true Dot Records tradition (the label that made their rep inflicting Pat Boone on an unsuspecting world) there’s even a “cover” version on here by a Milt Rogers of Dick Dale’s “Let’s Go Trippin'”!! Not the most essential set of tunes, but one hell of a fun compilation. [Cub Koda]

01. The Surfaris – Wax, Board And Woodie
02. The Chandelles – El Gato
03. The Blazers – The Masked Grandma
04. The King Pins – Door Banger
05. The Beachcombers – Lone Survivor
06. Willie & The Wheels – Skateboard Craze
07. The Rondels – On The Run
08. Milt Rogers – Let’s Go Trippin’
09. The Surfaris – (Get Your Kicks On) Route 66
10. The Galaxies – Tremble
11. Kay Bell & The Tuffs – (The Original) Surfer’s Stomp
12. Johnny Cymbal – (Surfin’ At) Tia Juana
13. Kenny & The Fiends – Moon Shot
14. Phil Sloan & The Fantastic Baggys – Dragon Lady

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THE HONDELLS – The Complete Motorcycle Collection [1964-66]

The Hondells - The Complete Motorcycle Collection1

“The Hondells were a west coast surf/hot rod band in the early 60’s that had songs on the Billboard Hot 100 and appeared in several movies like “Beach Blanket Bingo” and “Beach Party”.
The band toured throughout the United States with the Dick Clark Caravan of Stars and played with a USO tour in Vietnam. They released several albums on the Mercury label under the name of The Hondells. The main members of the band also played on and released songs as “The Weird-Oh’s” and “The Super Stocks”.
The band members were Richard “Ritchie” Burns, Wayne Edwards, Randy Thomas, Dennis McCarthy, Al Ferguson, Les Weiser and “King of The Fuzz” Davie Allan. Most of their material was produced by Gary Usher.”

Groovie 36 trax collection with their first two slabs + cool bonus stuff as Come On (Pack It On), You Meet The Nicest People On A Honda Bike, Freefall, Little Sidewalk Surfer Girl, and fine cover of Jody Reynolds’ classic Endless Sleep. Come along with me on a Honda Holiday!

The Hondells - The Complete Motorcycle Collection2

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The GOLDEN BREED [1968] soundtrack

GOLDEN BREED

Repost of this REAL COOL soundtrack featuring guitar hero Davie Allan along with members of the Riptides [as The Back-Wash Rhythm Band] and other West Coast studio vets as Harley Hatcher, Jerry Styner, Guy Hemric and Mike Curb. Fav tunes: What Turns You On, Coral Below, High Rise, Over The Falls, Waimea Bay, Surfers Paridise. Don’t miss this wave. Dig!

”This film marked the end of the longboard era.”

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JIM MESSINA & HIS JESTERS – The Dragsters [1964]

JIM MESSINA

“Early in his career — right at the outset, in fact — 18-year-old Jim Messina was a devotee of surf music, enamored of the music of Dick Dale, the Champs et al. The Jesters was among his early professional efforts, a surf band that included, along with Messina, Bill Beckman and Ron House on guitars, Jim Sholstedt on bass, Dave Archuleta on saxophone, and Larry Cundieff on drums. They won a lot of local band competitions in California, where the competition in the field was still fierce in 1965 and 1966, and were good enough to get to record an entire LP for Audio Fidelity. It was re-released on the Thimble label in the mid-1970’s, to capitalize on Messina’s success as one half of Loggins & Messina”

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”The original Jesters LP was released sometime in ’64 and was credited to “Jim Messina and his Jesters” (notice the copy of “Dick Dale and HIS Del-tones”) and it was called The Dragsters. This is the LP that was reissued on CD on the semi-legit Euro label Surf in the ’90s. It’s great stuff, 14 songs, 11 of them written by Messina. The covers are: an uptempo version of the Breeze and I, and surf-guitar-led versions of fifties instro hits Honky Tonk and Raunchy. Messina’s guitar work is truly exceptional, sounding like DD’s flashier doppleganger, with a lot of nimble fingerwork full of fast hammer-ons and pull-offs, and not as much double-picking as you may expect. (I only recently started noticing how Dick-Dale-ish Messina’s playing was. Listen to “The Thing” – it’s a total rip-off of DD’s “Surfing Drums” – which of course was a Bo Diddley rip-off itself! – and the licks he’s playing are completely DD. Messina also uses the pickup position #4 (neck and middle pickups) a LOT, which is also something that DD pioneered in surf music.) I HIGHLY recommend this CD. The highlights for me are “The Jester”, which is as good as any surf song I think, “The Cossack”, “High Voltage” (an apt title!), and “Yang Bu”. If there is one criticism I would have of the material is that it’s a bit light on melody, instead relying on groove, energy and improvisation. But it works most of the time. There’s a really nice jazz and even blues influence throughout, especially evident on “Suspense Run” and “Hollywood Sound” (both very jazzy in rhythm and featuring some tasty surf-blues guitar playing, with the latter obviously influenced by Mel Torme’s “I’m Comin’ Home Baby”). And as Messina mentioned in his interview, almost every song has a bunch of engine revving and tires skidding noises overdubbed. A lot of songs also have the noises of the band shouting along with the music, as if they’re really into it. I suspect these were overdubbed later, along with the car-related noises.” [IvanP. Originally posted on Surf Guitar 101, June 25, 2004]

Jim Messina And The Jesters 1

Ok surfers! Here you gotta deal with two different versions of The Jesters 60’s stuff. The first is original ’64 ”The Dragsters” lp version with 14 trax + ”Hollywood Sound”, the other one is 10 cuts ’82 reissue with different mix. So, whatcha gonna do now?!? I think you must dig both, cause this is one of the best 60’s surfin’ instro slabs and it’s… pretty much A MUST!!!

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AL CASEY – Jivin’ Around

Longtime session guitarist Al Casey is most noted for the records he made with producer Lee Hazlewood, with artists like Duane Eddy and Sanford Clark. He also has made numerous records on his own, reaching his commercial peak in the early 1960s, when a few of his instrumental (or mostly instrumental) surf and R&B-rock singles made the Top Hundred. In the 1960s and 1970s he worked often as a session player in Los Angeles, and was still putting out records under his own name in the 1990s. Casey was still in his teens when he started working with Hazlewood in Phoenix, introducing Lee to Sanford Clark, whose hit “The Fool” was produced by Hazlewood. Casey’s band backed Clark on the singer’s records, as well as other discs cut by Hazlewood. Casey was in Eddy’s band, the Rebels, in which he played the piano, although he’s more known for his guitar playing. Casey also wrote one of Eddy’s earliest hits, “Ramrod,” as well as cowriting another Eddy hit, “Forty Miles of Bad Road,” with Duane. In the early 1960s Casey was dividing his time between sessions in L.A. and Phoenix, and working with his own group, the Al Casey Combo. Somewhat surprisingly, considering his twangy background with Eddy and the surf recordings in his near future, his first successes were with bluesy instrumental rock singles with a jazzy organ groove (played by Casey himself). “Cookin'” made #92 on the pop chart, while a similar follow-up, “Jivin’ Around,” did a little better, getting to #71 pop and #22 in the R&B listings. In 1963, however, he and Hazlewood rode the surf craze and cut an entire surf LP, much of which featured Hazlewood compositions, and all of which had respectably tough reverberant guitar by Casey. A single from the album, “Surfin’ Hootenanny” (with almost incidental female vocals by the K-C-Ettes, aka the Blossoms), became Casey’s biggest hit, making #48; top L.A. session dudes Leon Russell (organ) and Hal Blaine (drums) were present on many or all of the tracks. Casey’s solo career petered out when the small independent label he recorded for, Stacy, closed shop around the beginning of 1964. Casey found a lot of work, though, as a session man, on recordings by artists including the Beach Boys, Eddy Arnold, and Frank Sinatra. He also ran a music store in Hollywood in the late 1960s, and played as a member of the band on Dean Martin’s television show. In the mid-’90s he made a solo recording for Bear Family, Sidewinder. [Richie Unterberger]

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60’s Surfin’ Chicks

Beach Girls

It wasn’t just guys singing about surfboards and hot rods during the surf and drag boom in the early ’60s; the girls were doing it, too, as this delightful 25-track compilation from Ace Records shows. Although nothing here was really ever more than a regional hit, these female singers and groups add a refreshing spin to a genre that puts a premium on motion and speed and expands love to include the sun, endless waves, and high-performance car engines. It adds up to a wonderful batch of rarities including Brian Wilson’s production of “Pray for Surf” by the Honeys (who included Marilyn Rovell, Wilson’s soon-to-be wife), “(Dance with The) Surfin’ Band” by Hal Blaine & the Young Cougars (drum legend Hal Blaine with the Blossoms on vocals), “Will You Love Me (Like You Did Last Summer)” by the Westwoods (Gracia Nitzsche singing an arrangement composed by her husband, Jack Nitzsche), a stomping “Drag Race Johnny” by Australia’s endearing Little Pattie, and the first ever effort by the great songwriting team of Ellie Greenwich and Jeff Barry, “Red Corvette,” which was billed to Ellie Gee & the Jets. Each of these sides is at least historically interesting, and if some, like a rare surf song from Motown Records, “Surfer Boy” by the Supremes, are conceptually improbable, each conjures up the sound and feel of an endless summer where it isn’t just the guys in motion. [ Steve Leggett]

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Rare Surf, Vol.6 – The Capitol Masters 2

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Pretty interesting collection of rare Capitol stuff from 50’s & 60’s, mostly Hot Rod, Girl Groups pop and some surf here & there. COOL STUFF: Shutdown Douglas & Hot Rod Rog [Hot Rod instros & songs from 60’s lp ”Hot Rod Rally”], Richie Allen, Susan Lynne ”Don’t Drag No More” & Sharon Marie [produced by Brian Wilson], Don Hinson ”Monster Surf Stomp”, Glen Campbell and the last track on cd which is actually Davie Allan & The Arrows version of ”Stranger From Durango”. Don’t Drag No More… Dig!!!

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