NERVOUS EATERS – Hot Steel And Acid / Eaterville #1 [70s/80s Punk]

 

The Nervous Eaters, one of Boston’s first punk/new wave bands, debuted in early 1977 with Steve Cataldo on vocals and guitar, Robb Skeen on bass, and Jeff Wilkinson on drums. Along with DMZ and The Real Kids, they were considered among the scene’s “punkier” bands. In the description of Allmusic’s Joe Viglione, they were the “Rolling Stones of Boston…hard-rocking, riff-blasting, tongue-in-cheek” By 1978, they were one of the most popular acts in the city. 

 

 

In ’76 they recoded their classic punk singles “Loretta” and “Just Head” for Rat Records. You could hear ’em on punk comps as Killed By Death or Feel Lucky Punk.

The band briefly reunited in 1986. to record ”Hot Steel And Acid”, cool punk mini Lp. ”Eaterville” compilation brings together rare stuff recorded between 1973 and 1975!- from studio sessions and demos along with their official Rat singles. Raw mix of Stones/Stooges rockin’ styles. Driving To New York, Dig!!!

 

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TRAVELER’S AID – Corduroy Roads / LITE STORM – Warning [Rare 70s Garage/Psych]

 

Two rare, early 70s US garage/psych slabs somehow simmilar in style. While Travelers Aid sole lp has more like raw rural rock, DIY garage sound [1970. private press 100 copies only], Lite Storm ’72 debut lp is kinda more cycedelic with male/female vocals [featuring Kali Bahlu], reminds me on raw, unpolished Music Emporium. ”This album was recorded prior to their coming under the “guidance” (read spell) of of an eastern religious guru [Sai Baba], who totally transformed their direction and sound for the remainder of their output”.Storm’s most accessible track ”Hanana” could be heard on Lycergic Soap and  Turds On A Bum Ride comps. Usually I’m not so keen on this kinda stuff [70’s hippie dippy shit] but there’s Wah Wah/fuzz guitar sound that appeals to me [some ”Bonehead Crunchers” vibe]. Originals of these lp’s change hands for lotsa $$$ nowdays, so… Check ’em out down there, Dig!

 

 

FLAMIN’ GROOVIES – Singles / Demo / Live / Bootlegs [70’s Mega Pack]

 

 

 

Ugh! Gorgeousness and Gorgeousity! An overkill of Groovie’s stuff. As you know Flamin’ Groovies were one of those high octane rock’n’roll groups of 60’s and 70’s same caliber as MC5, The Stooges or New York Dolls, so they deserve special Surfadelic treatment. Here we have some their 70’s singles, rare recordings and live stuff issued during several decades in various variations.

‘Slow Death’‘ – Trying to collect the Flamin’ Groovies can make you crazy. There are so many releases outside of their handful of official releases that it is hard to know which of the bootlegs, live shows, and demos you should get. Well, you definitely need this one. It focuses on the years after original wildman singer Roy Loney left the group and before the legendary Shake Some Action LP was released (October 1971 to July 1973, to be precise). The first six songs are self-recorded demos from 1971 and have been released a few times before, most notably as Grease on the Dog Meat label, but this is the first issue authorized by the band.”

”In Person!!!” – Live KSAN-FM broadcast from the closing of the Fillmore in San Francisco 1971. Great live garage sound! I Can’t Explain / Sweet Little Rock n’ Roller / Have You Seen My Baby / Road House / Doctor Boogie / Slow Death / Shakin’ All Over / Teenage Head / Louie Louie / Walkin’ The Dog / I’m A Man / Headin’ For The Texas Border.

 

 

 

”Sixteen Tunes: The Goldstar Tapes + More” – Same stuff as ”Grease: The Complete Skydog Singles Collection” Or “the great lost Groovies album,” filling some holes in the group’s discography. 16 Tunes combines the contents of the EPs Grease, Supergrease, and The Gold Star Sessions on one disc. The sound is raw, due to the fact that much of the material was outtakes and demos, and because Skydog never had ideal sources. Still, these are the Groovies in their prime years, and their energy and enthusiasm compensate for a multitude of technical flaws.

”I’ll Have A… Bucket Of Brains” The original 1972 Rockfield recordings Produced by Dave Edmunds. A personnel re-formation took place prior to the Flamin’ Groovies relocation to England, where the Rockfield sessions were held in August of 1972. The lineup now featured Chris Wilson (vocals , guitar) and James Ferrell (guitar), who replaced Roy Loney and Tim Lynch . Dave Edmunds immediately took to the Groovies, especially Jordan and Wilson’s power pop masterpiece “Shake Some Action.” In fact, Edmunds’ enthusiasm would almost immediately instigate Jordan’s equally inspired “You Tore Me Down,” which was written and recorded on the spot. Just as impressive are the cover versions of Frankie Lee Sims’ “Married Woman,” “Get a Shot of Rhythm & Blues,” and “Little Queenie.”

 

 

”Home To Roost” – Very rare Groovies LP collection of singles ’72-’75, studio recordings taken from various sources, plus several rehearsals recorded in San Francisco in 1971. 1. I Can’t Explain 2. Little Queenie 3. Married Woman 4. Get A Shot Of Rhythm And Blues 5. Talahassee Lassie 6. You Tore Me Down 7. Him Or Me 8. Jumpin’ Jack Flash 9. Blues From Phillys 10. Let Me Rock 11. Dog Meat 12. Sweet Little Rock ‘N’ Roller 13. Slow Death

Live At The Roxy L.A. 1976. & Live In San Francisco 1979. – Solid quality Bootlegs.

 

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R@M0#E$ – !t’$ Al!^e [Vinyl Rip!]

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”This amphetamine-paced double-LP served as a Ramones career retrospective, smack at their peak, and shows the Queens crew almost stumbling across hardcore around the same time California was inventing it. Over four nights in 1977 at London’s Rainbow Theater, the punk pioneers blasted through 28 songs from their first three albums. (Thanks to their tidily short length, they squeezed in nearly all of ’em.) The final LP version came mostly from the last night, charged with an energy so electric that fans are said to have ripped seats from the floor and thrown them at the stage in enthusiasm. It’s no surprise, as the entire record pulses with American punk’s promise, a spittle-spewing Joey Ramone barely pausing between “Pinhead,” “Do You Wanna Dance?” and “Chain Saw.” He even barely pauses long enough to get out all the lyrics, the band buzzing away behind him like they’re in a machine shop. During post-production, the speed was something with which even the band itself struggled to keep up. In his book, Hey Ho, Let’s Go: The Story of the Ramones, Everett True writes that Dee Dee needed extra fuel to record bass overdubs: an extra-heavy helping of black coffee.” Arielle Castillo

 

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Ahh, sweet memories of teenage years. This was the first R@M0#E$ lp I’ve bought in ’84. while in highschool. It was a time when I was headbanging to the beat of The Clash, The Stranglers, Buzzcocks, Undertones, Blondie, Pistols, Dead Kennedys … It’s a West German issue that was most easier to find in Europe back then. I know you’re over stuffed with R@M0#E$ stuff but then again… they are my no.1 favorite band and this is one of the best live rock lps and Surfadelic vinyl rip is far superior to CD version you can find out there. So… 1-2-3-4 … Dig!!!

 

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JOHN DU CANN – The World’s Not Big Enough [1977. Glam/Power Pop]

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”The World’s Not Big Enough is the only solo album by John Du Cann, who was best known as guitarist and vocalist with Atomic Rooster and Hard Stuff in the 1970s. The album was recorded in 1977, but remained unreleased until 1992.”

”John Du Cann joined Atomic Rooster in 1970 after fronting The Attack, a now-legendary freakbeat band, and Andromeda, a heavy rock group. He was with Rooster for the hit singles “Tomorrow Night” and “Devil’s Answer”.  Du Cann subsequently joined Bullet  (with Rooster drummer Paul Hammond) and signed to Purple Records (they subsequently changed their name to Hard Stuff). He later played in Thin Lizzy (as a replacement for Gary Moore) until, in 1977, he recorded his first “solo” album.

For various reasons, this LP was shelved and it is only now getting its first official release. At this time, John was part of the same management stable as Status Quo and he enlisted the help of Francis Rossi, who produced and played on the album.  Also featured are keyboard player Andy Bown (ex-The Herd) and Angel Air stalwart John McCoy on bass (Gillan, Mammoth).

This CD release of “The World Is Not Big Enough” features an impressive collection of demos, singles and outtakes.”

”…three-minute punk-ish pop ditties that could just as easily been blaring out of speakers contemporaneous to anything by The Cars, Blondie or Cheap Trick. “Power Pop” …and much better than the rest, I think. Atomic Rooster fans…know that this is going to be great rock and roll but they would have never guessed at the form it would have taken. Status Quo fans will want to snap it up for the contributions from both Andy Bown and Francis Rossi. Everybody else, don’t be a dummy and get this thing as soon as you can!” Music America, (July 1999)

 

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BINGO! French Punk Exploitation 1978-1981/ PAINK – French Punk Anthems 1977-1982

 

”In the face of Plastic Bertrand’s huge success ‘Ça Plane Pour Moi’, big labels in France thought they understood how it worked. Very soon, music publishers and majors all wanted a punk hit. Barclay, RCA, Polydor… all of ’em wanted their own ‘Ça Plane Pour Moi’. Sure, most of these punk hoaxes are as lousy as it gets, but one must admit that some of these cuts managed to stand out and surprise.”

More French punk in these two Born Bad Records comps. While Bingo! is punk exploitation oriented collection with many tunes you could already hear on ”Je Suis Punk” lp [Bingo! has improved sound quality], Paink deals with more angry real punks. Anyways, both comps have great sound + Surfadelic bonus with Guilty Razors ’78. Ep, Warm Gun ’77. single and more punk surprises. And now en français: Vive Le Punk!

 

 

WHO’S A PUNK? / JE SUIS PUNK – The Very Best of British & European Punksploitation

 

 

”First came ‘Je Suis Punk”, a collection of unheard French Punk “punksploitation” obscurities (i.e. band’s who were created to – or changed their sound in order to cash in on the burgeoning “punk fad”), and now comes “Who’s A Punk?” – the British counterpart to those finicky Francs. LOADED with razor-sharp riffs and catchy as hell melodies designed to make you pogo your safety pins right off!”

”Absolutely scorching compilations of what is known, alternately, as either “fake punk” or “punksploitation;” in other words, the short-lived practice of putting together a group of seasoned session musicians and asking them to produce a loud and crude punk single in order to quickly cash in on the punk “fad” that was peaking in the late 70s. You would think that this would be a recipe for disaster, but in practice it’s actually great. To me, it’s the best of both worlds; you have people who are seasoned veterans at writing and arranging songs, but you’re asking them to do something very immediate, loose, and off the cuff. So, what you end up with is very well-written and well-arranged songs that are kind of deliberately stupid. What could be better? If you have a Crass tattoo or something I could see finding this whole scene kind of offensive, but if you like a lot of those early British punk groups who were actually around before punk but adopted the look in order to ride the wave of punk’s popularity–bands like the Boys, Slaughter and the Dogs, the Vibrators, maybe even the UK Subs and Cock Sparrer–then you will absolutely love this compilation… there isn’t a dud on it.”

Vinyl rip of these two great unofficial comps with rare UK & French late 70’s early 80’s punk/new wave exploitation gems. Fake punk rules! Do you feel lucky, well, do ya, punk?

WHAT IT IS! Funky Soul And Rare Grooves [1967-1977]

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”Too many reissue compilations are content to merely slice ‘n’ dice familiar catalog choices in not particularly original ways. But this four-disc, 91-track trove of obscure ’70s R&B and funk from Warner-distributed labels great and small argues there’s still treasure to be gleaned from studio vaults–a five-hour groove-fest that’s as interested in shaking booty as in opening ears. Even the genre’s groundbreaking usual suspects (Wilson Pickett, the Bar-Kays, Curtis Mayfield, Earth, Wind & Fire, et al) are represented by selections that aren’t immediately familiar, while Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin serves up a radically different, previously unreleased take of “Rock Steady.” Still other stars contribute their sonic touches to some of the lesser-known cuts, as witnessed by the patent trippiness of Sly Stone alter-egos 6ix and Stanga on “I’m Just Like You” and “Little Sister,” respectively; the stark, party-not-so-hearty contrast of the Mayfield-written-and-produced “Hard Times” by Baby Huey & Baby Sisters; and the Meters’ version of “Tampin’,” released under the moniker of the Rhine Oaks.

Sequenced in rough chronological order, it’s a savvy window into a musical evolution as well, with the rhythmic guitars, organ swells, and horn flourishes of traditional ’60s R&B giving way to sinewy synths and increasingly chunky bass lines as the decade grooves on. While savvy hip-hoppers will note that many of the rarities here have already been repurposed by shrewd mixers, it’s a revelation to hear them in their original form. A compelling deconstruction of an often clichéd and too-narrowly-defined genre, this is an anthology that showcases music that has influenced such contemporary artists as Tupac, the Beastie Boys, Snoop Dogg, and Kanye West, annotated by many of the original musicians who set the dance floor in motion.” — Jerry McCulley

 

 

”This is a pretty sick compilation. It’s funkin’ awesome. You will be funkin’ all night to it. Alright no more shtick. Get it, if you love funk.”

”I am 1% cooler for having listened to this.”

”Quite possibly the finest compendium of funk one could possibly lay their ears on. Takes a while to get through and digest, but is high on accessibility and nearly perfect in quality and diversity (big names as well as guys I’ve never heard of before). Mark this one as essential.”

 ”Pimpin, Simply pimpin.”
”Basically the Nuggets of R&B, except it consistently beats its mainstream competition.  If you’re into the style, this is essential.  A good number of these are instrumentals, but that’s not a bad thing.”
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Funky Surfadelic, Dig!!!

JEAN-CLAUDE PELLETIER – Streaking! [1974. Euro Funk/Lounge]

Jean-Claude Pelletier - Streaking!

 

Streakers! Streaking! Streak!

Continuing the story of 70’s Euro funk, here’s superfine ’74 ”streaking” funky slab by French composer, arranger and conductor Jean-Claude Pelletier and his orchestra. You could hear ”Special Streaking” on Funky Flea comp., and now you can taste entire lp of cool funky instro/lounge dedicated to runnin’ nude maniacs. Hello Streakers!

FUNKY FLEA vol.1 [Rare 60’s & 70’s Euro Lounge]

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Interesting non official, custom made compilation [by Space Debris] of rare 60’s & 70’s lounge, latino & funky grooves by Euro acts as Chakachas, Chicken Curry & His Pop Percussion Orchestra, 101 Strings, Chocolat’s, Nico Gomez, André Brasseur, Brasil Tropical Sound, Francis Lai, Jean-Claude Pelletier, The Chinese Fighters, The Manzanilla Sound… Sound check by Surfadelic. Cool & Sexy, Dig!