THE REAL KIDS – No Place Fast [1981/82]/ Hit You Hard [1983]

 

More ace power pop/punk by these Boston rockers. “No Place Fast” is actually “Outta Place” 1982.lp on Star Club records + “Taxi Boys” mini lp issued on Bomp rec in 1981. With slightly different lineup John Felice put out some pretty solid power popsters as ‘Can’t Talk To That Girl’, ‘No Place Fast’, ‘Senselass’, ‘ Outta Place’, ‘What’s It To You’, ‘ Bad To Worse’, ‘Everybody’s Girl’

”Hit You Hard” is 1983. lp on New Rose records, featuring another version of ‘She’ and superfine slices of power pop like ‘Hit You Hard’, ‘Now You Know’, ‘Where I Wanna Be’, ‘Right When It’s Right’, ‘She’s A Mess’… produced by Andy Paley [of Paley Brothers].

 

 

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THE REAL KIDS – st [1977] + ’74/’77 Demos!

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American punk/power pop rock’n’roll band from Boston, Massachusetts formed as The Kids in 1972 by John Felice after he left The Modern Lovers. They played 50’s & 60’s/Groovies/ Stooges/ VU/ Dolls influenced raw garage pop punk. In 1977. Red Star Records issued The Real Kids classic debut slab with twelve raw rockin’ tunes, 9 originals as ‘All Kindsa Girls’, ‘Solid Gold (Thru And Thru)’,,’Better Be Good’, ‘She’s Alright’, ‘My Baby’s Book’, ‘Do The Boob’, ‘Raggae Raggae’… and fine covers of Buddy Holly, Eddie Cochran and Huey “Piano” Smith songs. This here is a vinyl rip of their debut lp plus newly found rippin’ proto-punk 1974/’77 demo tapes of their first recordings. ‘Like their name, these guys were for real’. Dig!!!

 

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THE BOYS – st [1977]

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“Although they were swiftly overtaken by the emergence of a custom-crafted power pop movement, for much of 1977-1978 the Boys reigned supreme in the bright and breezy bubble punk stakes, simply churning out a succession of two-to-three-minute gems that flooded not only their albums and singles, but also the realms of the alter-ego Yobs. Patently influenced by the Ramones but readily avoiding the most obvious traps by virtue of their own understanding of what made a pop song tick, the Boys’ first two singles, “I Don’t Care” and “The First Time,” remain period classics, while their debut album, September 1977’s The Boys, went on to nibble the U.K. Top 50 at a time when such glories were still a rare achievement. Tightly scything guitars, sharply embroidered keyboards, and Kid Reid’s contagiously imploring vocals dominate the proceedings, a relentlessly crisp buzzsaw whine that is as melodic as it is fast and as irresistibly singalong as it is either. Time, the enemy of so many punk-era artifacts, hasn’t dented the album’s pleasures; indeed, it might even have heightened them, as a direct line of descent to the modern likes of Green Day is revealed in living neon.” [Dave Thompson]

 

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”The Boys debut album is one of the great overlooked records of the UK punk scene. Fourteen tracks of exciting, high-energy rock ‘n’ roll, in a touch over 28 minutes, of a rare quality that rivals even the mighty Ramones early albums. Punk Rock heaven.”

”Track after track bear witness to the amazing energy, sense of melody and creativeness of The Boys, arguably the best melodic punk band alongside The Buzzcocks.”

“What to buy after you got the SEX PISTOLS, CLASH, RAMONES, BUZZCOCKS, DAMNED & GENERATION X albums? THE BOYS, baby!!!!!  You only need to know 2 chords to make a killer riff and the BOYS prove that left and right on their debut. Super cool ’77 punk. Don’t miss out.”

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(((o)))

 

LIVERPOOL ECHO – s/t [1973]

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”Power pop has never sounded so powerful! When former Mandrake Paddlesteamer mainstays Brian Engel and Martin Briley convened as Liverpool Echo in 1973, the Beatles had been in the grave for just three years, and the world still desperately wanted them back — so desperately that, with a band name borrowed bodily from an old Merseybeat-era newspaper, what could any record company do, but lift a “Fabs”-headlined copy of the paper for an album cover? But “Beatles Come Home So Quietly” really wasn’t the most appropriate banner for an LP jacket, all the more so since, once you hit the vinyl, the spirit of the “Moptops” hung so heavily over the music that it screamed out for attention. Of course, it was true that any early-’70s band that was capable of melding melody with studio-borne creativity would inevitably be tarred “the new Beatles” (as Badfinger and 10cc would readily testify); it is also true that all such comparisons were then hopelessly devalued by the arrival of the Rutles. But still Liverpool Echo have an uncanny grasp of the Merseybeat sound circa 1963 and 64, spliced with a healthy hint of the Hollies, and that was more than enough to raise high hopes for the album. Unfortunately, hope was all that the record label (Spark) could do. They certainly had no promotion or distribution muscle to speak of, and both band and LP sank within seconds, to lie forgotten until Revola revived it (with excellent Mark A Johnston liner notes) in 2005.” [Dave Thompson]

Beatlesque ”Hard days’ night” era style power pop/beat. Dig!!!

 

BARRACUDAS – Through The Mysts Of Time [Surf-Punk/Power Pop]

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”This London-based Anglo-American band was formed in 1979 and scored a U.K. chart hit in 1980 with the neo-surf song “Summer Fun.” Their punkish attitude comes from a red-hot, enthusiastic amateurism. The band melded together the sounds of pop surfers like Jan & Dean with hip urban post-garage rockers like Flamin’ Groovies and song-oriented ’60s ensembles like the Byrds. The result of this formula is infectious, unexpected, and raw. This collection comprises demos, outtakes, and alternate versions from the same era as the Drop Out and Meantime LPs.”

“Rougher and rawer than this old English power pop quartet’s otherwise fun singles and LPs, this 71-minute, 25-track collection of earlier demos, outtakes, and other rarities replaces such works as 1981’s Drop Out and 1983’s Mean Time as the definitive statement on a truly underrated ’60s-infested band. The Barracudas were looking back in the midst of a punk revolution — covering Burt Bacharach and Hal David’s “Little Red Book” just like Love or the Standells — and succeeding just the same, probably because, like the unrelated but not totally dissimilar mod revival bands of the time, they brought a purely modern crunch and crackle to the thick guitars underneath the songs about girls. This is boy/girl punkish pop before it became an ’80s/’90s staple”[Jack Rabid]

 

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THE ROOTS OF POWERPOP! [1979-1981]

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This compilation chronicles the style that happened right after punk rock, when some of the bands learned how to play their instruments a little better and started borrowing melodies and harmonies from old ’60s pop records. This marriage of melody and energy spawned a couple years’ worth of exciting music and a lot of it happened on Bomp during the years 1979-1981.

Fine overview of late 70’s US power pop scene supported by famous Bomp! records, including bands like The Romantics, The Real Kids, The Flamin’ Groovies, Shoes, 20/20, The Nerves, The Zeros, The Last, The Plimsouls and some lesser known acts as M&Ms, Mystery Machine, Nashville Rumblers or Wombats. Dig The Pop!

 

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POWERPEARLS Vol.1-10 [70’s/80’s Worldwide New Wave/Power Pop/Punk Rarities]

 

Ten volumes unofficial lp collection series of mostly rare late 70’s/ early 80’s mod, pop, punk and new wave from all over the globe. Some fine power pop stuff mixed with some rather lame tunes. You can find well known acts as The Only Ones. The Records, The Barracudas, Plimsouls, Shoes, Stiv Bators, Rich Kids … Quality varies from part to part with vol. 10 being the weakest one. Anyways, there are enough cool shit to dig alright?! Dig!

 

FLAMIN’ GROOVIES – Now [1978/2005 DBK]

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”While it took a long and torturous five years for the Flamin’ Groovies to find their way back to an American record deal with Shake Some Action, a year and a half later the band had a follow-up ready, and while 1978’s Flamin’ Groovies Now isn’t quite as cohesive as the album that preceded it, in many respects the band sounds at once tighter and more relaxed, with some time on the road firming up the rhythm section while giving the songs a bit more room to swing (which wasn’t one of the strong suits of the British Invasion bands that provided their aural template). The band lost guitarist James Ferrell during the post-Shake Some Action tour, but former Charlatans picker Mike Wilhelm proved to be a more than simpatico replacement on these sessions, and while leader Cyril Jordan didn’t come up with another new song as transcendent as “Shake Some Action,” “All I Wanted” comes pretty close. But it’s significant that most of the songs on Flamin’ Groovies Now are covers, and while all of them are played with love, enthusiasm, and the right period flair (especially the Beatles’ “There’s a Place,” Paul Revere & the Raiders’ “Ups and Downs,” and “Move It,” an early U.K. hit for Cliff Richard), they give the album a feeling of being padded, and just because covering the Rolling Stones rarity “Blue Turns to Grey” was a good idea didn’t mean the Flamin’ Groovies had any business tackling “Paint It Black.” All in all, Flamin’ Groovies Now is a terrific-sounding record that captures a fine band when it was in great form.” [Mark Deming]

 

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”After their power pop masterpiece Shake Some Action (1976), the Groovies did actually release two equally great albums, Now (1978) and Jumpin’ in the Night (1979) both in the same winning style as Action: Brit invasion, early rock’n’roll and Byrds jangle, done with enough attitude to compete with current punk scene.”

”This 1978 Sire album, produced by Dave Edmunds, put the Groovies back on the map as the band won fervent praise on both sides of the Atlantic. They apply their fiery British Invasion-inspired sound to the Rolling Stones’ Paint It Black ; the Byrds’ Feel a Whole Lot Better ; the Beatles’ There’s a Place , and a bunch of original tunes.”

 

UK version of Lp with different tracks listing

UK version with different tracks listing

 

As you probably know, there are different versions of this Lp but don’t worry, everything’s here. 15 trax with some personal favs: Between the Lines, Take Me Back, Good Laugh Mun, Yeah My Baby, All I Wanted. Now… Dig!!!

 

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THE BLACK AND WHITES – st [2008. Power Pop/Punk]

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The Black And Whites were created as a home recording project by Talbot Adams in New Orleans, LA in the late 1990’s. The project flourished as a band in Oxford, MS in the Mid 2000’s. They play Ramones/Devil Dogs, 70s/90s influenced garage-pop-punk with passion and energy. After three excellent 45s they released their sole Lp on Douchemaster Records. Fun tunes ’bout good girls, bad girls, multiple girls, bad expectations, broken hearts… Some said it was one of the best record to come out in 2008. Here you got it + 4 bonus singles trax. In Black & White, Dig!!!

 

 

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