IRON VIRGIN vs PLOD – [UK Glam Rock 1974/75]

Iron Virgin were a Scottish glam rock band of the 1970s. Their early stage garb has been compared to A Clockwork Orange, with their later stage costumes similar to American football uniforms, but with added iron chastity belts.
The band formed in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1972 where they were discovered by Decca Records producer Nick Tauber and signed to the label’s “progressive” offshoot, Deram. Their first single was “Jet”, a cover from Paul McCartney’s Band on the Run album. Recorded in December 1973, the song was released in February 1974. It was getting exposure until McCartney himself issued his version as a single, effectively smothering Iron Virgin’s recording.
Their second, and best known, single was “Rebels Rule”, from their 1974 album of the same name. It scored reasonable reviews and a variation called “Stand Up for Kenny Everett” was often played on the BBC by the DJ of the title. The song has been described as “A brilliantly bombastic ode to teenage anarchy; the single’s commercial failure is one of the great mysteries of its era. [wiki]

Iron Virgin2

The Mighty Plod were formed in May 1972 by Colchester Musician Steve Greenfield. The original line-up was Michael Natkansk (drums), Martin Newell (vocals), Carl Symanski (bass), John Fitzsimons (guitar). Their music was based on glam rocks hits of the day such as Slade and Sweet, and a selection of rock’n’roll standards like ‘Johnny B. Goode’ and ‘Shakin’ all over’ done in a fast thrash style. In 1975 the band recorded five studio tracks including the amazing ‘Neo City’. The Mighty Plod turned up again in a feature on lost treasures from the Glam Rock era, the most important bands that got away.

Hot rebell stuff from glitter era. Glam Slam thank you ma’am. Dig!!!

 

 

 

SHADY LADY – Raving Mad (Glam/Proto-Punk 1970-73)

Shady Lady - Raving Mad

Around 1969 in Greenwich Village, New York, Stefen Shady, Gerhard Helmut and John Christian got together and started forming a band that would become known as ‘Shady Lady’. They were having a difficulties finding the other two members to complete the group. They had been auditioning musicians for months to no avail. One night at a ‘Doors’ concert in the East Village they ran into Johnny Thunders, (pre ‘New York Dolls’) whom Stefen already knew. Stefen told Johnny that they were putting this band together and that they were looking for another guitar player and a drummer. He asked if he was interested in auditioning but Thunders was playing bass at the time and they already had a bass player in Gerhard. After having run out of prospects they soon headed west to Los Angeles where they met guitarist, Leonard Denault. They had already been conducting auditions with other musicians and decided on Leonard as their fourth member. They hadn’t had much luck with drummers as they were looking for a dynamic Keith Moon type.

One day they got a call from Billy McCartney who turned out to be the drummer they were looking for. Now, all the musicians were finally in place. Stefen and John already had a pocketful of tunes that they had written and were continuing to write more all the time. Soon after, a manager was procured but after a short while decided he wasn’t leading them in the right direction and gave him the boot. Robert Stigwood then found the band and offered his expertise. The only problem was Stigwood’s involvement with some other significant major projects which caused the band to shy away. Not long after, Robert Fitzpatrick approached with his offer of management. It turned out that Fitzpatrick had formerly been partnered up with Stigwood and together they had successfully managed Eric Clapton’s band, ‘Cream’ as well as ‘The Bee Gees’ along with some other noted musical talents. ‘Shady Lady’ signed with the Robert Fitzpatrick Corporation, who also was managing Taj Mahal, Buddy Miles, Genya Raven and Bobby Whitlock at the time. Robert was their business manager and his associate Max Byfuglin became the band’s personal manager. Fitzpatrick invested a good deal of his time and money in the group. Also, Max Baer (Jethro from The Beverly Hillbillies TV series) and football great turned actor, Jim Brown had investments in the band. Under Fitzpatrick’s guidance the band started playing the local venues, always being introduced as “the world’s most beautiful rock ‘n roll band.” It wasn’t long before they had an army of ardent fans. ‘Shady Lady’ held all of their rehearsals at either Dress Revue or at the S.I.R. Sound Stages. (Sorry, if anyone thought that they were really a garage band although it sounds good) Actually, at one point they did play in their garage once in awhile. That was when they lived across the street from Ricky Nelson in Nichols Canyon. But hey, ‘Ricky Nelson And The Stone Canyon Band’ rehearsed in the Nelson’s garage.

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Sometimes the band held open rehearsals at the studios but soon found out they had to hire security when they did. The studio would be packed as so many kids would show up and there would be a line formed down the sidewalk. The fans were great though, lots of cute girls all dressed up getting into the whole glam thing, the guys did too. However, ‘Shady Lady’ as well as ‘The New York Dolls’ didn’t just start “glam rock” but they also were the jump-starters of “punk rock” along with the infamous ‘Iggy Pop’. ‘Shady L’ and ‘The Dolls’ may have looked glam but both bands had punk attitudes. One time, this obnoxious reporter from some local L.A. rag got all miffed because he was ejected from Shady Lady’s dressing room at Oop-Poo-Pah-Doos. Stefen had asked Bill Rhodes, the band’s road manager to throw the guy out as the guy was being an asshole and Bill promptly did so. The next time the paper was published there was an article calling ‘Shady Lady’ a shitty litter of young “punks.” That really was probably the very first time a rock band was referred to as punks. Anyway, the band didn’t care, they thought any and all publicity was good publicity and they got their share of both good and bad. As long as people were talking about you it didn’t matter is what they said. They just kept playing and having a good time with an occasional bar brawl here and there. Numerous recording offers came their way including such companies as Atlantic, MCA and CBS records but they ended up signing with Scepter Records.

The band had three albums worth of new material to record but only ever recorded one, which by the way was never released. They recorded all but one song at The Record Plant in Los Angeles. That one song being, “Night Witch” was recorded at Larabee Sound Studios also in Los Angeles. Max Byfuglin, John and Stefen produced the recordings. They also had some really talented musicians helping out on some of the sessions such as John Hobbs on piano, Genya Raven, who sang backup on the very nasty lyric tune, “Down ‘N Dirty” while Bobby Whitlock played the Hammond B3 organ on “Stranger”. Stevie Wonder was recording next door in the studio and they borrowed Stevie’s Moog synthesizer along with Malcom who played with Stevie to make it sound right. Buddy Miles showed up regularly for moral support and there seemed to be plenty of white powder daily to keep the band going into the wee hours. Leonard says, he thinks the sax player they used was the then unknown, Dave Sanborn but can’t say for certain. The album was coming along fine and was almost complete except for some fine tuning when they got word Scepter Records were in trouble and were going bankrupt. Everything crashed at that point.

Drugs, ego clashes and now the defunct record label had exacted it’s toll and the band split up. Fitzpatrick and Max called Stefen into a meeting and asked him to go solo which he declined. The band members went their seperate ways. John took off to London, England and Stefen returned to New York City. Stefen ran into The Dolls at Max’s Kansas City not long after he arrived. The Dolls manager immediately asked if Shady Lady would go on an upcoming tour with The Dolls not knowing they had disbanded. After a couple months had gone by Johnny Thunders, his girlfriend Sable Starr and Stefen decided to get an apartment together. The winter was approaching and upon the day of the move-in Stefen called from the airport telling them he was going back to Los Angeles. He had gotten homesick for the warmer city on the West coast. After arriving back in L.A., Stefen and Gerhard attempted to reform the band but it never happened. John had returned but he had been just too overcome by drugs and alcohol. Shady Lady – Raving Mad was recorded in ’72-’73 at the Record Plant in Los Angeles.

Shady Lady - Rav

Surfadelic presents more obcure proto-punk/glam stuff from 70’s. Here are lost glam rock punkers from L.A. just fer you NY Dolls fans and others. Hip, Hip, Dig!!!

The Brats – Criminal Guitar/Rock Candy [NY Proto-Punk/Glam 73/78]

The Brats1

When guitarist Rick Rivets left the fledgling NEW YORK DOLLS in 1972, he didn’t switch gears so much as he just assembled one of the toughest US Glam rock bands of the era, …

The Brats were among the earliest offshoot bands from the New York Dolls. The New York-based quartet was formed by Rick Rivets, an alumnus of the Dolls, with drummer Sparky Donovan, vocalist Keith West (not connected at all to the singer from the U.K.-based Tomorrow), and Andy Doback. The group was organized by Rivets in the early ’70s and based in Queens, NY. Rivets was already putting together a band, and had Donovan on board when he chanced to visit the Music Box, a now-legendary record store on Union Turnpike in Queens, where Keith West offered the best in used records, underground U.S. releases, U.K. and German imports, and bootlegs. A leading exponent of the Flamin’ Groovies, Dr. Feelgood, and a brace of lesser-known but equally important acts of the time, West was already a kind of rock & roll guru to a lot of teenagers and college students in the area. West was also a good singer with a charismatic persona, and soon became part of Rivets’ plan. With David Leeds filling out the fourth spot, they rehearsed in SoHo (then a newly opened industrial-cum-residential part of Manhattan) and moved into Bleecker Street, where their early rehearsals and gigs had them brushing up against a pre-fame Kiss.

Their sound was a punchy brand of glam rock, somewhat similar to the New York Dolls (for whom they opened at their first gig) and they were also heavily influenced by the Kinks, the Yardbirds, and the early Rolling Stones. Their mix of originals and covers of the latter bands’ repertory attracted a fair amount of attention at venues such as Max’s Kansas City, and they earned the imprimatur of no less a figure than Alice Cooper (who, so it is said, came up with the group’s name) — they wrote a song for him, in turn, entitled “I’m So Cruel.” Their lineup went through numerous changes between 1973 and 1975, with Leeds departing, Mark Mayo joining on lead guitar, and Mark Polott taking the bass spot. They lasted into the punk era, which they may have helped herald, and may have been an influence on the Ramones; it was rumored for years that the latter group’s “Beat on the Brat” was a reference to the rival group.

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The Brats got onto the live compilation Max’s Kansas City 1976, cut at the legendary New York venue, and they released one single with a cool A-side and an incredible B-side called “If You Can Rock You Can Roll.” Sadly, the group never earned serious coverage of their music by the mainstream press, and only broke into local news over a mishap at a gig. One night at a show, in an incident that recalled the appearance of the Who on The Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour, the explosives they used to punctuate their stage act singed (or worse) some audience members, which earned them coverage in the local tabloids of the time. Rivets later moved on to other bands, including the Corpse Grinders. A reunion of the Brats took place soon after the start of the new century, and their music, old and new, continues to excite and intrigue new listeners in the 21st century. -Allmusic.com

Aloha from Hell !!! Mr.Eliminator is out in the streets again [for few more rounds].

Hello & Greetings to everyone !!! And Now… DIG !!!

 

 

Bonehead Crunchers Vol.1-5 [Garage, Proto-Punk, Glam Obscurities 1969-75]

bonehead-crunchers-1 bonehead-crunchers-2a bonehead-crunchers-3 bonehead-crunchers-4 bonehead-crunchers-5

Fuzzed-out proto-punk madness across US, UK, Eu & Australia from late 60’s to mid 70’s. Here you gotta deal with some real obcure acts doin’ kinda anarcho-hard rock, mindless boogie, glam, proto-metal & garage shit you maybe don’t wanna know but you will. Lotsa interesting & rare stuff for you to dig. It’s a ”Big Boobs Boogie” goin’ on !

Bonehead Crunchers Vol.1 (USA)
Bonehead Crunchers Vol.2 (USA)
Bonehead Crunchers Vol.3 (UK)
Bonehead Crunchers Vol.4 (Euro)
Bonehead Crunchers Vol.5 (Aus)

Jayne/Wayne County & The Electric Chairs – The Ultimate “T-Girl Rock’n’Roll”

  ELECTRIC CHAIRS 1JAYNE COUNTY & ELECTRIC CHAIRS S1R-6422946-1418841143-8272.jpegJAYNE COUNTY & ELECTRIC CHAIRS R1privateoysterfrontJayne County - Deviation [1995]_Goddess+of+Wet+Dreams

This is ultimate retrospective for my alltime favorite shemale NY punk rocker. Legendary stuff like Eddie & Sheena, Bad In BedMax’s Kansas CityRock & Roll Resurrection, F*** Off, Toilet Love, Speed Demon, Cry Of Angels, Mr. Normal, Trying To Get On The Radio, Wonder Woman, Midnight Pal and her later solo work are simply A MUST for all you punkers out there. If you dig CBGB sound, NY Dolls/Johnny Thunders/Ramones and stuff this is fer ya. I wanna know –  Are You Man Enough To Be A Woman ?” Dig!!!

ZOLAR X – X Marks The Spot [2007]

If the 20-song compilation of interstellar glam rock Timeless wasn’t enough for sci-fi rock collectors, there’s hope yet. Nearly 35 years after Zolar X formed, they swooped in to return with their second album, X Marks the Spot. While their ability to keep the Martian man costume party going this long is astounding, what’s more intriguing is that nothing has changed since their ’80s album, Zap! You’re Zolarized. They sound (and look, according to the album cover) completely identical to the way they did with the original incarnation of the band. Songwriting is still top-notch and they are as vicarious as they were in their multicolored pixie-wigged heyday. Even the production quality sounds identical. Fans will be pleased as punch that the grown-up version of the band is still singing about laser beams, humanoids, and meteors, and ultimately has stayed true to the original vision of the group. Most importantly, they haven’t lost their ability to craft huge hooks and melodic harmonies, especially on the spacecraft-themed “Retro Rockets” and “Saucers on Sunset.” Even after all these years, they rock as hard they did in the ’70s. It’s almost as if they haven’t aged at all. Perhaps they really are aliens.
[Jason Lymangrover]
GLAM SLAM FROM OUTER SPACE
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FLASHBACKS OF A FOOL

Memories
Reminiscences
& Broken Dreams
 One of the most touching film scenes I saw recently. Maybe the movie isn’t perfect but these “Roxy” moments are. Check It Out!
 …Shake your hair girl with your ponytail
Takes me right back (when you were young)
Throw your precious gifts into the air
Watch them fall down (when you were young)
Lift up your feet and put them on the ground
You used to walk upon (when you were young)
Lift up your feet and put them on the ground
The hills were higher (when we were young)
Lift up your feet and put them on the ground
The trees were taller (when you were young)
Lift up your feet and put them on the ground
The grass was greener (when you were young)…
[Roxy Music “If There Is Something” 1972.]