STEPPIN’ HOT [Fourteen 60’s Soul Sizzlers]

Steppin' Hot Fourteen 60's Soul Sizzlers1

 

HOT indeed! KILLER comp. of 60’S funky/soul stompers in vein of ”Downtown Soulville”, ”Jerk! Shake! And Vibrate!”, ”All Night Soul Stomp!” and stuff. Boogaloo Dancefloor Romp’n’Stop! 14 cuts vinyl rip. Stepping Hot, Dig!!!

 

Steppin' Hot Fourteen 60's Soul Sizzlers2

***

 

 

Advertisements

IT’S HAPPENING Vol.1-13 [60’s Mod/R&B/Soul]

 

Here’s complete lp comp. series with cool mix of of some rare late 60’s/early 70’s Mod, Soul, Funk, R&B, Lounge dance tunes. It’s kinda mod overdose… Well, IT’S what’s HAPPENING alright, Dig!!!

[Special message for sunnyboy66 – Take it easy man ok?!]

MITCH RYDER & THE DETROIT WHEELS – Surfadelic Collection !!!

mitch-ryder-and-the-detroit-wheels

 

”Formed in Detroit in 1964. they served as Mitch Ryder’s backup band from 1964 to 1967. The band had a number of top twenty hits in the mid-1960s before lead singer Ryder was enticed away by Bob Crewe with offers of a solo career, after which the group quickly dissolved.

Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels had their first big hit in 1965 with “Jenny Take a Ride”, which reached #10 on national charts, and #1 on the R&B chart – the first time a self-contained rock group had achieved the latter distinction. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA. Crewe had originally planned to release the track as a B side, but changed his mind after seeing the reactions of Brian Jones and Keith Richards, of The Rolling Stones, who were in the Stei-Philips studio in New York City as it was being recorded.

 

 

Ryder and the Detroit Wheels followed up with another top twenty hit, “Little Latin Lupe Lu,” which peaked at #17. After a couple of misses, the group had its biggest hit with the “Devil with a Blue Dress On”/”Good Golly Miss Molly” medley which reached #4. Around this period they also recorded a number of albums, largely composed of reworked R&B classics, along with a smattering of original compositions.

In 1967 Ryder had another top ten hit with “Sock It to Me, Baby!”, which was banned by some stations as too sexually suggestive. The band had its last hit with the brassy “Too Many Fish in the Sea”/”Three Little Fishes” single, which reached #24. Crewe then persuaded Ryder to quit the group and embark on a solo career.” [wiki]

Yep! Another Surfadelic comp. This one already have been posted but this is fresh edition, an ultra-dynamic Detroit R&B/Soul rockers collection gathering Mitch Ryder’s best 60’s sides with The Detroit Wheels. Sock it to me baby, Dig!!!

 

mitch_ryder_and_the_detroit_wheels b2b

***

 

 

WHAT IT IS! Funky Soul And Rare Grooves [1967-1977]

What It Is! a

 

”Too many reissue compilations are content to merely slice ‘n’ dice familiar catalog choices in not particularly original ways. But this four-disc, 91-track trove of obscure ’70s R&B and funk from Warner-distributed labels great and small argues there’s still treasure to be gleaned from studio vaults–a five-hour groove-fest that’s as interested in shaking booty as in opening ears. Even the genre’s groundbreaking usual suspects (Wilson Pickett, the Bar-Kays, Curtis Mayfield, Earth, Wind & Fire, et al) are represented by selections that aren’t immediately familiar, while Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin serves up a radically different, previously unreleased take of “Rock Steady.” Still other stars contribute their sonic touches to some of the lesser-known cuts, as witnessed by the patent trippiness of Sly Stone alter-egos 6ix and Stanga on “I’m Just Like You” and “Little Sister,” respectively; the stark, party-not-so-hearty contrast of the Mayfield-written-and-produced “Hard Times” by Baby Huey & Baby Sisters; and the Meters’ version of “Tampin’,” released under the moniker of the Rhine Oaks.

Sequenced in rough chronological order, it’s a savvy window into a musical evolution as well, with the rhythmic guitars, organ swells, and horn flourishes of traditional ’60s R&B giving way to sinewy synths and increasingly chunky bass lines as the decade grooves on. While savvy hip-hoppers will note that many of the rarities here have already been repurposed by shrewd mixers, it’s a revelation to hear them in their original form. A compelling deconstruction of an often clichéd and too-narrowly-defined genre, this is an anthology that showcases music that has influenced such contemporary artists as Tupac, the Beastie Boys, Snoop Dogg, and Kanye West, annotated by many of the original musicians who set the dance floor in motion.” — Jerry McCulley

 

 

”This is a pretty sick compilation. It’s funkin’ awesome. You will be funkin’ all night to it. Alright no more shtick. Get it, if you love funk.”

”I am 1% cooler for having listened to this.”

”Quite possibly the finest compendium of funk one could possibly lay their ears on. Takes a while to get through and digest, but is high on accessibility and nearly perfect in quality and diversity (big names as well as guys I’ve never heard of before). Mark this one as essential.”

 ”Pimpin, Simply pimpin.”
”Basically the Nuggets of R&B, except it consistently beats its mainstream competition.  If you’re into the style, this is essential.  A good number of these are instrumentals, but that’s not a bad thing.”
What It Is! b
Funky Surfadelic, Dig!!!

A HISTORY OF GARAGE & FRAT BANDS IN MEMPHIS 1960-1975 Vol.1 & 2

 

”A History of Garage and Frat Bands in Memphis, 1960-75 is a Memphis garage rock compilation that was released in conjunction with the book ‘Playing for a Piece of the Door’, by Ron Hall. The book is a candid history and discography of over one hundred garage rock bands who recorded at least one record in Memphis between1960-1975.”

Hmmm… More appropriate title would be ‘History of Garage and Soul Bands in Memphis’ as approximately 30% of the stuff are R&B tunes [especially on vol.2]. It’s a pretty interesting collection of some fine rare 60’s recordings transferred directly from original vinyls [not master trax], so the sound is bit raw & grainy here and there but anyway cool [I’ve fixed some cliks & crackles]. Some of the bands could be heard on other comps as Flash & The Casuals on ”Uptight, Tonight” comp, Danny Bunk And The Invaders on ”Hang It Out To Dry!”, The Escapades and The Breakers on ”Pebbles”, The Scepters on ”Everywhere Chainsaw Sound” etc. but some tunes can be find only here as The Coachmen ”Possibility”,  great Sci-Fi instrumental ”The Mysterians” by Jimmy Tarbutton And The Memphis Sound or rare garage gem Los Angeles Smog Division ”Blue Green” with ”borrowed” Pretty Things ”LSD” riff. Ok, check my favs below ‘n’ Dig!!!

 

 

 

SHORTY LONG – Here Comes The Judge [1968]

R-1351178-1390603739-3063.jpeg

“Alabama singer, musician and composer Shorty Long relocated to Detroit, after touring with The Ink Spots. He was signed to Harvey Fuqua’s Tri-Phi label, where he released three singles that did not chart. When Fuqua sold his business to Berry Gordy, Long became a Motown artist. More singles followed with little success on the subsidiary label Soul, starting in 1964 with “Devil in the Blue Dress”, which Mitch Ryder covered and turned into a huge hit. Long had to wait until 1968 for a change of luck, when his funky composition “Here Comes the Judge” went to the Top 10. Motown rush-released an album, with all the singles and new songs. The following year, after recording his second album (which he also produced, a privilege that only Smokey Robinson had at Motown, by then), Long died in a boating accident on the Detroit river.”

Now! Here’s pretty fine slice of sweet 60’s R&B/Soul music for your sweet summer vacation. Vinyl Rip! Ain’t no justice? Here comes Mr.Eliminator, Dig!!!

R-1351178-1390603761-8981.jpeg R-6587681-1422635485-5721.jpeg

!!! FUNKY BROADWAY !!!

”Dyke & the Blazers were one of the first acts possibly the first notable act to play funk other than James Brown. Indeed, they often sounded like a sort of junior version of Brown and the JB’s, playing songs in which the rhythms and riffs mattered more than the tune. Similarly, vocalist Dyke Christian sang/grunted words that mattered more for the feeling and rhythm than the content. Their best-known track, “Funky Broadway, ” was covered for a bigger hit by Wilson Pickett, though Dyke & the Blazers got a few more R&B hits before Dyke was shot to death in 1971.”
Subtitled The Ultimate Broadway Funk, no one’s going to beat this as the ultimate Dyke & the Blazers compilation. The two-CD, two-hour-and-20-minute set has everything they released on 45 or LP between 1967-1970, including unedited full-length versions of seven of their singles, no less than 13 previously unissued tracks, and even some radio station promos.

It could be that less intense funk/Dyke fans might wish for a more succinct single-disc comp concentrating on the official singles, especially as, like many single-artist funk anthologies, the grooves get a little similar-sounding over the course of two-plus hours. Then again, if you like the group enough to get a Dyke & the Blazers collection in the first place, you might well be the type who thrives on such lengthy dwellings on the primeval funk groove. And as such grooves went, few were better (and very few artists, if any other than James Brown, did them earlier) or earthier than Dyke & the Blazers, even if it turns out that session musicians (including members of the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band) often played the parts of the Blazers in the studio.

The anthology is conveniently divided into one disc of their 1966-1967 sessions (all held in Phoenix, where the band was based at the time) and a second of their 1968-1970 sessions (which all took place in Hollywood), though the quality remains consistent throughout. That counts the many unreleased tracks, which are generally up to the standard of what the band officially released, including some (like the ultra-kinetic — if marred by some out-of-tune horns — &”She Knows It,” the upbeat “Let’s Do It Together,” and the untypical serious ballad “Why Am I Treated So Funky Bad?”) that would have ranked among their more interesting efforts had they been issued at the time.” [Richie Unterberger]
If you want your funk long, dirty & uncut, this is fer ya. Dyke gonna funk you long time. Stay in the groove!
.