BO DIDDLEY : Drive by – Tales From The Funk Dimension 1970-1973

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Bo Diddley not only is one of the key architects of Rock & Roll, in my eyes he’s also one of the founding fathers of Funk. No one played a guitar that percussively as Bo did back in the ’50s.

This great CD – which also features fantastic liner notes and images of LP cover art – brings together some of the funkiest tracks Bo recorded between 1970 and 1973.

From the masterpiece ‘Black Gladiator’ (1970) come “Elephant Man”, “Black Soul”, “Funky Fly”, “I Don’t Like You” and “Shut Up Woman”.

From ‘Another Dimension’ (1971) – the ill-fated ‘covers’-album – come two Creedence Clearwater Revival updates, but it’s Bo’s self-written funk gems “Pollution” and “Go for Broke” that really put the swing in that LP.

Next up is Diddley’s best-loved funk album, ‘Where It All Began’ (1972). A non-stop, no-filler, all-killer album, it’s only due to time shortage that it isn’t available in its entirety here. The hilarious “Hey Jerome” is fantastic, with another highly infectious ‘ad lib’ from Bo, as is the hardrocking funk opus “Bo Diddley-Itis”. “Infatuation” is a nice, soulful ballad, while “Take It All Off” is more straight-up boogie funk.

From ‘Big Bad Bo’ (1973), Bo’s last album for Chess, come three more sweaty workouts: “Bite You”, “Hit or Miss” and the headbobbing, horn heavy “Stop the Pusher”.

This is GOLD. [soulmakossa]

 

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Black Soul!

Real COOL comp. of trax taken from Bo’s four funk albums released in the early 70’s. Although you can dig entire lp’s in the Bo Diddley section of this blog, this is superfine overview of his funky stuff. 

[And remember: Fuck! Richie Unterberger and his reviews]

 

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(((o)))

 

 

TONY JOE WHITE – Voodoo Village [Surfadelic Collection]

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”They say your village lies
In the western part of town
And that evil spirits are lurking all around
But I’m not scared of you
For evil can be found
Looking almost anywhere not just in voodoo town…”

”Tony Joe White is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, best known for his 1969 hit “Polk Salad Annie” and for “Rainy Night in Georgia”, which he wrote but was first made popular by Brook Benton in 1970. Dusty Springfield reached the charts with White’s “Willie and Laura Mae Jones”. He also wrote “Steamy Windows” and “Undercover Agent for the Blues”, both hits for Tina Turner in 1989; those two songs came by way of Turner’s producer at the time, Mark Knopfler, who is a friend of White. “Polk Salad Annie” was also recorded by Elvis Presley and Tom Jones.” [wiki]

This is a Surfadelic tribute to favorite swamp rock maestro from bayous of Oak Grove, Louisiana. With powerful Elvis like baritone voise and wyld wah-wah guitar playin’, Tony made his own brand of voodoo/funky/soul music. Just check out tunes as Stud Spider, Even Trolls Love Rock And Roll, Don’t Steal My Love, Elements And Things, Soul Francisco or Voodoo Village and you’ll know what I’m talking about. He also did some great covers of Reddings ‘‘Hard To Handle”, Dale Hawkin’s ”Susie Q” and Johnnie Taylor’s ”Who’s Making Love”. This collection covers White’s recordings from 1968 to 1976 for Monument and Warner Bros. records. Surfadelic got soul! Dig!!!

 

”Down in Louisiana, where the alligators grow so mean
There lived a girl, that I swear to the world
Made the alligators look tame…”
[Polk salad Annie]

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IT’S HAPPENING Vol.1-13 [60’s Mod/R&B/Soul]

 

Here’s complete lp comp. series with cool mix of of some rare late 60’s/early 70’s Mod, Soul, Funk, R&B, Lounge dance tunes. It’s kinda mod overdose… Well, IT’S what’s HAPPENING alright, Dig!!!

[Special message for sunnyboy66 – Take it easy man ok?!]

MITCH RYDER & THE DETROIT WHEELS – Surfadelic Collection !!!

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”Formed in Detroit in 1964. they served as Mitch Ryder’s backup band from 1964 to 1967. The band had a number of top twenty hits in the mid-1960s before lead singer Ryder was enticed away by Bob Crewe with offers of a solo career, after which the group quickly dissolved.

Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels had their first big hit in 1965 with “Jenny Take a Ride”, which reached #10 on national charts, and #1 on the R&B chart – the first time a self-contained rock group had achieved the latter distinction. It sold over one million copies, and was awarded a gold disc by the RIAA. Crewe had originally planned to release the track as a B side, but changed his mind after seeing the reactions of Brian Jones and Keith Richards, of The Rolling Stones, who were in the Stei-Philips studio in New York City as it was being recorded.

 

 

Ryder and the Detroit Wheels followed up with another top twenty hit, “Little Latin Lupe Lu,” which peaked at #17. After a couple of misses, the group had its biggest hit with the “Devil with a Blue Dress On”/”Good Golly Miss Molly” medley which reached #4. Around this period they also recorded a number of albums, largely composed of reworked R&B classics, along with a smattering of original compositions.

In 1967 Ryder had another top ten hit with “Sock It to Me, Baby!”, which was banned by some stations as too sexually suggestive. The band had its last hit with the brassy “Too Many Fish in the Sea”/”Three Little Fishes” single, which reached #24. Crewe then persuaded Ryder to quit the group and embark on a solo career.” [wiki]

Yep! Another Surfadelic comp. This one already have been posted but this is fresh edition, an ultra-dynamic Detroit R&B/Soul rockers collection gathering Mitch Ryder’s best 60’s sides with The Detroit Wheels. Sock it to me baby, Dig!!!

 

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WHAT IT IS! Funky Soul And Rare Grooves [1967-1977]

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”Too many reissue compilations are content to merely slice ‘n’ dice familiar catalog choices in not particularly original ways. But this four-disc, 91-track trove of obscure ’70s R&B and funk from Warner-distributed labels great and small argues there’s still treasure to be gleaned from studio vaults–a five-hour groove-fest that’s as interested in shaking booty as in opening ears. Even the genre’s groundbreaking usual suspects (Wilson Pickett, the Bar-Kays, Curtis Mayfield, Earth, Wind & Fire, et al) are represented by selections that aren’t immediately familiar, while Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin serves up a radically different, previously unreleased take of “Rock Steady.” Still other stars contribute their sonic touches to some of the lesser-known cuts, as witnessed by the patent trippiness of Sly Stone alter-egos 6ix and Stanga on “I’m Just Like You” and “Little Sister,” respectively; the stark, party-not-so-hearty contrast of the Mayfield-written-and-produced “Hard Times” by Baby Huey & Baby Sisters; and the Meters’ version of “Tampin’,” released under the moniker of the Rhine Oaks.

Sequenced in rough chronological order, it’s a savvy window into a musical evolution as well, with the rhythmic guitars, organ swells, and horn flourishes of traditional ’60s R&B giving way to sinewy synths and increasingly chunky bass lines as the decade grooves on. While savvy hip-hoppers will note that many of the rarities here have already been repurposed by shrewd mixers, it’s a revelation to hear them in their original form. A compelling deconstruction of an often clichéd and too-narrowly-defined genre, this is an anthology that showcases music that has influenced such contemporary artists as Tupac, the Beastie Boys, Snoop Dogg, and Kanye West, annotated by many of the original musicians who set the dance floor in motion.” — Jerry McCulley

 

 

”This is a pretty sick compilation. It’s funkin’ awesome. You will be funkin’ all night to it. Alright no more shtick. Get it, if you love funk.”

”I am 1% cooler for having listened to this.”

”Quite possibly the finest compendium of funk one could possibly lay their ears on. Takes a while to get through and digest, but is high on accessibility and nearly perfect in quality and diversity (big names as well as guys I’ve never heard of before). Mark this one as essential.”

 ”Pimpin, Simply pimpin.”
”Basically the Nuggets of R&B, except it consistently beats its mainstream competition.  If you’re into the style, this is essential.  A good number of these are instrumentals, but that’s not a bad thing.”
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Funky Surfadelic, Dig!!!

A HISTORY OF GARAGE & FRAT BANDS IN MEMPHIS 1960-1975 Vol.1 & 2

 

”A History of Garage and Frat Bands in Memphis, 1960-75 is a Memphis garage rock compilation that was released in conjunction with the book ‘Playing for a Piece of the Door’, by Ron Hall. The book is a candid history and discography of over one hundred garage rock bands who recorded at least one record in Memphis between1960-1975.”

Hmmm… More appropriate title would be ‘History of Garage and Soul Bands in Memphis’ as approximately 30% of the stuff are R&B tunes [especially on vol.2]. It’s a pretty interesting collection of some fine rare 60’s recordings transferred directly from original vinyls [not master trax], so the sound is bit raw & grainy here and there but anyway cool [I’ve fixed some cliks & crackles]. Some of the bands could be heard on other comps as Flash & The Casuals on ”Uptight, Tonight” comp, Danny Bunk And The Invaders on ”Hang It Out To Dry!”, The Escapades and The Breakers on ”Pebbles”, The Scepters on ”Everywhere Chainsaw Sound” etc. but some tunes can be find only here as The Coachmen ”Possibility”,  great Sci-Fi instrumental ”The Mysterians” by Jimmy Tarbutton And The Memphis Sound or rare garage gem Los Angeles Smog Division ”Blue Green” with ”borrowed” Pretty Things ”LSD” riff. Ok, check my favs below ‘n’ Dig!!!