THE REAL KIDS – Grown Up Wrong

THE REAL KIDS - Grown Up Wrong FC

 

Boston’s proto-punk/power pop rockers the Real Kids have been lionized as legendary through the years that have passed since their short, original run. The few studio recordings they released officially during their lifespan contain great, hook-ridden songs but don’t hint at the true ferocity that fans who caught them “back in the day” swear to. Luckily, Norton Records has blessed the world with Grown Up Wrong, and this incredible live document confirms that every bit of ancient hyperbole about the Kids was true. The tracks are culled from a live radio broadcast, unreleased soundboard tapes, and the band’s two tracks from the seminal Live at the Rat compilation; the Real Kids prove to be just as sweaty and explosive as rumored, far more visceral than their studio recordings ever suggested. For fans of high-velocity, no-nonsense rock & roll, this is the Real Kids record to start with. They may be a bit sloppy and over-amphetamined, but it’s exactly as they were meant to be heard, with full-tilt Rickenbacker riffing and energy that leaks out of the speakers and into the listener. The best cuts are aggressive, sneering put-downs to old girlfriends who, whether they realize it or not, screwed up by walking away; “Bad to Worse,” “Hit You Hard,” and the perfect breakup anthem, “All Kindsa Girls,” are all rousing pep talks for anyone who suffers from a broken heart. Also exceptional is a moving read of “Common at Noon,” a tough but mournful lament over lost love and the passage of time itself (“This ain’t my town/It ain’t like it used to be/When you were still hanging around”). Covers of Eddie Cochran, the Rolling Stones, and Mitch Ryder tunes are tributes to heroes at hypersonic speeds performed at a time when simply showing respect for the roots of rock was a rebellious act. The WCMF broadcast has the best fidelity and focus, though the audience reaction on the club cuts is infectious and enviable. The Real Kids might have burned out too fast, but the scorch can still be felt all these years later, and Grown Up Wrong will assure any true rocker of this remarkable band’s raw brilliance. ~ Fred Beldin

This really is a superb collection of live recordings from Boston’s legendary Real Kids. Straight ahead, high energy, no B.S. rock and roll in the fine tradition of the Ramones, Iggy, Dolls and the MC5 (as the MC mentions in his intro) with the melodic quality of the Beatles and Kinks thrown in for good measure. Do The Boob!

 

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THE REAL KIDS – No Place Fast [1981/82]/ Hit You Hard [1983]

 

More ace power pop/punk by these Boston rockers. “No Place Fast” is actually “Outta Place” 1982.lp on Star Club records + “Taxi Boys” mini lp issued on Bomp rec in 1981. With slightly different lineup John Felice put out some pretty solid power popsters as ‘Can’t Talk To That Girl’, ‘No Place Fast’, ‘Senselass’, ‘ Outta Place’, ‘What’s It To You’, ‘ Bad To Worse’, ‘Everybody’s Girl’

”Hit You Hard” is 1983. lp on New Rose records, featuring another version of ‘She’ and superfine slices of power pop like ‘Hit You Hard’, ‘Now You Know’, ‘Where I Wanna Be’, ‘Right When It’s Right’, ‘She’s A Mess’… produced by Andy Paley [of Paley Brothers].

 

 

THE REAL KIDS – st [1977] + ’74/’77 Demos!

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American punk/power pop rock’n’roll band from Boston, Massachusetts formed as The Kids in 1972 by John Felice after he left The Modern Lovers. They played 50’s & 60’s/Groovies/ Stooges/ VU/ Dolls influenced raw garage pop punk. In 1977. Red Star Records issued The Real Kids classic debut slab with twelve raw rockin’ tunes, 9 originals as ‘All Kindsa Girls’, ‘Solid Gold (Thru And Thru)’,,’Better Be Good’, ‘She’s Alright’, ‘My Baby’s Book’, ‘Do The Boob’, ‘Raggae Raggae’… and fine covers of Buddy Holly, Eddie Cochran and Huey “Piano” Smith songs. This here is a vinyl rip of their debut lp plus newly found rippin’ proto-punk 1974/’77 demo tapes of their first recordings. ‘Like their name, these guys were for real’. Dig!!!

 

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!!! BUZZCOCKS !!!

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“Feeling like I’m almost sixteen again
Layin’ ’round doing nothing like all my friends
Play it cool don’t get angry count up to ten
Just like I was sixteen again”

 

Legendary 70’s pop punkers from Bolton , UK famous for their fast & melodic gems like Orgasm Addict, What Do I Get?, Ever Fallen In Love?, Lipstick, Fast Cars, I Don’t Mind, Sixteen Again… One of the first punk groups to establish an independent record label [four-track EP “Spiral Scratch”]. In ’78/’79 they produced three classic LPs  ‘Another Music in a Different Kitchen’, ‘Love Bites’, ‘A Different Kind of Tension’ and one of the best singles collections ever: ‘Singles Goung Steady’. ‘Product’ is a ’89 collection of all of their 70’s albums plus ’81 mini lp and some live stuff.  R.I.P. Pete Shelley, thank you for the music…

 

“Feeling rather strange when you’re sixteen again
Things don’t seem the same the past is so plain
This future is our future this time’s not a game
This time you’re sixteen again…”
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THE BOYS – st [1977]

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“Although they were swiftly overtaken by the emergence of a custom-crafted power pop movement, for much of 1977-1978 the Boys reigned supreme in the bright and breezy bubble punk stakes, simply churning out a succession of two-to-three-minute gems that flooded not only their albums and singles, but also the realms of the alter-ego Yobs. Patently influenced by the Ramones but readily avoiding the most obvious traps by virtue of their own understanding of what made a pop song tick, the Boys’ first two singles, “I Don’t Care” and “The First Time,” remain period classics, while their debut album, September 1977’s The Boys, went on to nibble the U.K. Top 50 at a time when such glories were still a rare achievement. Tightly scything guitars, sharply embroidered keyboards, and Kid Reid’s contagiously imploring vocals dominate the proceedings, a relentlessly crisp buzzsaw whine that is as melodic as it is fast and as irresistibly singalong as it is either. Time, the enemy of so many punk-era artifacts, hasn’t dented the album’s pleasures; indeed, it might even have heightened them, as a direct line of descent to the modern likes of Green Day is revealed in living neon.” [Dave Thompson]

 

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”The Boys debut album is one of the great overlooked records of the UK punk scene. Fourteen tracks of exciting, high-energy rock ‘n’ roll, in a touch over 28 minutes, of a rare quality that rivals even the mighty Ramones early albums. Punk Rock heaven.”

”Track after track bear witness to the amazing energy, sense of melody and creativeness of The Boys, arguably the best melodic punk band alongside The Buzzcocks.”

“What to buy after you got the SEX PISTOLS, CLASH, RAMONES, BUZZCOCKS, DAMNED & GENERATION X albums? THE BOYS, baby!!!!!  You only need to know 2 chords to make a killer riff and the BOYS prove that left and right on their debut. Super cool ’77 punk. Don’t miss out.”

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(((o)))

 

Songs The RAMONES Taught Us

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”The Ramones never shied away from a good cover tune, and their tastes were generally confined to ’60s radio pop, girl group, surf, and a touch of psychedelic garage rock. They even went so far as to record an entire album of covers with 1993’s lighthearted Acid Eaters, a set of covers that leaned heavily on masters of psychedelic garage like Love, the Seeds, and the Troggs as well as early-’60s surf classics from the Beach Boys and Jan & Dean. The Ramones: Heard Them Here First is an easy mark, collecting the original versions later recorded by a band whose members wore their influences proudly on their sleeves and were drawn more to genre-defining classics than obscure rarities. The collection is thorough, moving in chronological order from Chris Montez’s “Let’s Dance” (covered on the Ramones’ 1976 debut album) through to Louis Armstrong’s “What a Wonderful World” and the Stooges’ “1969” as covered by Joey Ramone on his posthumous 2002 album, Don’t Worry About Me. Ace did their homework, too, because not even a cover of 1910 Fruitgum Company’s goofy bubblegum hit “Indian Giver” from a late-’80s 12″ B-side was lost in the shuffle. The only covers that aren’t from the golden age of late-’50s and 1960s teen pop and surf are Motörhead’s tribute to the band “R.A.M.O.N.E.S.” and Tom Waits’ wistful Peter Pan tale “I Don’t Wanna Grow Up” from his 1992 masterpiece, Bone Machine. There’s nothing revelatory about the collection, but these classic tracks make sense together as much as they did when covered in a sped-up punked-out fashion by the Ramones, who were a classic band in their own right.” [Fred Thomas]

24 trax comp with originals covered by Ramones + 9 more trax added by Surfadelic for complete overview of bros’ 60’s & 70’s r’n’r favs. Take It As It Comes, Dig!!!

 

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JAYNE/WAYNE COUNTY & THE ELECTRIC CHAIRS – Let Your Backbone Slip / Rock ‘n Roll Cleopatra [Transgender Punk Rock]

 

Jimi played guitar with rock and roll cool.
You wanna dirty sound you’ve got to treat your guitar cruel.
Manic depresssion’s gonna take you higher.
If you wanna make hot love you’ve gotta stand next to your fire.
[”Rock & Roll Resurrection” 1978]”

Jayne County was the John Waters of rock music, crafting blatantly offensive and goofy music that delivered mean-spirited entertainment and a hilarious freak show. Bragging up her own importance on virtually every other song, some of County’s best music can be found on this compilation. “Storm the Gates of Heaven” is one of the most silly, offensive, angry, and campy songs to grace the punk movement, delivering a disdain for Christianity with tongue firmly in cheek and middle finger proudly raised. Elsewhere she chastises those who won’t take her home (“Fuck Off”), celebrates the twisted men who go through her life (“Mean Muthafuckin’ Man”), and sings a tribute to filthy bathroom affairs (“Toilet Love”). Vile, nasty, and hilarious, County is obviously not for everyone. In fact, as the years go by, the audience who would enjoy her routine seems to get narrower and narrower. But this is a document of an important performance artist; in the ’70s her live shows couldn’t be touched for sheer energy and entertainment. And these songs were the backbone of those shows; even if they weren’t always good, they at least had the charismatic snarl of County delivering their hideous message. For anyone curious about the New York punk scene, this is high-priority stuff even if it contains some of the least-important music of the period. County, like many punk musicians, has overcome her talents to become a personality, and that personality is strong enough to make this a recommended collection. [Bradley Torreano]

”Rock me Jesus, roll me lord. Wash me in the blood of rock and roll”

 

”Jim was the master of show and tell.
You wanna go to heaven you gotta raise some hell.
The crystal ship is sinking. The ocean waves are rough.
If you wanna get down you’ve got to learn to get it up.”

 

Ambitious, eclectic, and absolutely contagious, Let Your Backbone Slip is the successor to the dynamite Rock ‘N Roll Cleopatra, a compilation that trawls a back catalog that too many people overlook — but which most would certainly enjoy. Image and reputation notwithstanding, Jayne County’s songwriting and performance evince an understanding of pop at its purest, one long series of electrifying jolts that evoke memories of a golden era as readily as they pinpoint the purpose of the modern age. That the modern age was usually too busy contemplating other charms at the time is its own problem. Chronologically, Let Your Backbone Slip opens by rounding up material from the first two Electric Chairs albums that was omitted from the earlier set; the avoidance of the group’s third LP, the sensational Things Your Mother Never Told You, meanwhile, is at least partially remedied by the inclusion of three tracks from a 1979 BBC session. In truth, the performances are nowhere near as great as the originals — “Berlin” is too fast, “Waiting for the Marines” is too straight — but they’re a fine inclusion regardless. The heart of Let Your Backbone Slip, however, delves into County’s 1980s material, a period that received precious little attention at the time and allowed two excellent albums, Betty Grable’s Legs and Private Oyster, to pass by unnoticed. Six tracks from the latter include the anthemic “Are You a Boy or Are You a Girl?,” the Cossack-themed “I Fell in Love With a Russian Soldier,” and the exquisite ’60s girl group pastiche “The Lady Dye Twist” (chorus: “I want a wedding just like Lady Diana”), all three of which insist that County’s grasp of rock & trash/kitsch & roll is as tight as it ever was at the height of her earlier, New York-centric fame. County’s true appeal, however, exceeds whatever parameters that description might lay out. Great pop music should be sexy, fun, moving, and motivating. From the deifying “Max’s” to the cruel “Bad in Bed,” from the mocking “Mr Normal” to the moving “Love Lives on Lies,” Let Your Backbone Slip is all four — and then some. [Dave Thompson]

 

”Speed demon, Hell is for heroes, I’m told
Speed demon, Lake of fire and brimestone
World War I, World War II,
World War III, that’s me and you

 

Collections of recordings from the first transsexual star of Punk rock which is definitively not for the faint of heart. Wayne started out doing impersonations of Cher, Dusty Springfield and Janis Joplin before finding his way with the Electric Chairs and spearheading the Punk movement of the mid-west. She shocked, she outraged, she pulled no punches. Her in-your-face attitude empowered her followers and helped usher the late ’70s Punk movement into the mainstream. These two comps feature 2 x 20 tracks from albums, singles and rare EP’s. Jayne/Wayne’s is one of the greatest unsung heroes of the early N.Y. punk scene. I’ve already posted his/hers entire catalogue but these are great best of collections, a MUST HAVE for punkers and other r’n’r’ faces. It’s a ”Transgender Rock ‘n Roll” alright! Dig!!!

 

”If you wanna rock and roll resurrection
you gotta have a rock and roll reformation.”

 

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GENERATION X – The Best Of [Glam Punk 1977-1981]

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”I’m not in love with television
I’m not in love with the radio
I’m not in love with the Kings Road
Because I’m in love with Cathy McGowan,
she said
Ready steady go, all things she said
Ready steady go, wasn’t it fabulous”

 

Do you remember Generation X ? Ya know late 70’s Top Of The Pops gigs with young [pre ‘Rebel Yell’ days] Billy Idol and songs like King Rocker, Wild Youth, Ready Steady Go and stuff. Well, those were the days you could meet The Strangles, The Jam, Buzzcock, Undertones, The Clash, The Rezillos and others new wave/punk groups performing their new singles and hits on TV . Cool days indeed. ”Generation X ain’t in the same league as the Clash or the Pistols but the group nevertheless kicked up a fair amount of dust and recorded some memorable singles and a classy debut album. They were, after all, the first of the punk bands to truly embrace the rock industry and all its trappings.” Here is a ’85 collection of these glam punksters best trax from their three LPs & singles + some bonus cuts. Running With The Boss Sound! Dig!!!

 

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R@m0#e$ – Br@!n Dr@!n [1989] Vinyl Rip!

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”It landed in a field in Idaho
Where it came from, I don’t know
It did not look like it came from Japan
And out of the dark walked a strange man…”

 

Huh! Can you believe it’s almost 30 years since this lp was out? ”Time waits for no one, and it won’t wait for me” said some bigmouth poet. Anyways, ’88/89. were pretty cool years for r’n’r – Iggy’s comback with “instinct”, Bowie too with Tin Machine, Keith Richards cool solo slab “Talk is Cheap”, Lou Reed’s ‎”New York”, then there were underground & alternative rock forces as Pixies with ”Doolittle, Primal Scream, The Jesus & Mary Chain ”Automatic”, The Godfathers ”More Songs About Love & Hate”… In the summer of ’89 I was on trip in Italy where I bought two great records – comeback lp for The Cramps “Stay Sick” and this Ramones 11th studio album. Over the years, I’ve changed my opinion on this record several times and now think it’s a cool one. On ”Brain Drain” [the last lp with Dee Dee] Ramones continued with harder, Motorhead kinda rockin’ style, starting out with the great opener ”I Believe In Miracles” [well I do, alright!] and other favs as killer ”Zero Zero UFO”, ”Don’t Bust My Chops”, fine cover of Freddy Cannon’s ”Palisades Park”. On side B you got ”Pet Sematary” which became one of Ramones biggest hits, and solid tunes like ”Can’t Get You Outta My Mind”, ”Come Back, Baby” and ”Merry Christmas (I Don’t Want To Fight Tonight). There are couple of tunes heavily influenced by Motorhead ”Learn To Listen” and ‘‘Ignorance Is Bliss”. Altogether, It’s a pretty solid slab, they don’t make it like that anymore! And remember, Ramones don’t have a lame album.  Don’t Bust My Chops ‘n’ Dig!!!

”If you think it’s a pack of lies,
I saw it happen with my own eyes
A million miles from the milky way
A hundred years, a month and a day”
[”Zero Zero UFO”]

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BARRACUDAS – Through The Mysts Of Time [Surf-Punk/Power Pop]

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”This London-based Anglo-American band was formed in 1979 and scored a U.K. chart hit in 1980 with the neo-surf song “Summer Fun.” Their punkish attitude comes from a red-hot, enthusiastic amateurism. The band melded together the sounds of pop surfers like Jan & Dean with hip urban post-garage rockers like Flamin’ Groovies and song-oriented ’60s ensembles like the Byrds. The result of this formula is infectious, unexpected, and raw. This collection comprises demos, outtakes, and alternate versions from the same era as the Drop Out and Meantime LPs.”

“Rougher and rawer than this old English power pop quartet’s otherwise fun singles and LPs, this 71-minute, 25-track collection of earlier demos, outtakes, and other rarities replaces such works as 1981’s Drop Out and 1983’s Mean Time as the definitive statement on a truly underrated ’60s-infested band. The Barracudas were looking back in the midst of a punk revolution — covering Burt Bacharach and Hal David’s “Little Red Book” just like Love or the Standells — and succeeding just the same, probably because, like the unrelated but not totally dissimilar mod revival bands of the time, they brought a purely modern crunch and crackle to the thick guitars underneath the songs about girls. This is boy/girl punkish pop before it became an ’80s/’90s staple”[Jack Rabid]

 

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