IRON VIRGIN vs PLOD – [UK Glam Rock 1974/75]

Iron Virgin were a Scottish glam rock band of the 1970s. Their early stage garb has been compared to A Clockwork Orange, with their later stage costumes similar to American football uniforms, but with added iron chastity belts.
The band formed in Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1972 where they were discovered by Decca Records producer Nick Tauber and signed to the label’s “progressive” offshoot, Deram. Their first single was “Jet”, a cover from Paul McCartney’s Band on the Run album. Recorded in December 1973, the song was released in February 1974. It was getting exposure until McCartney himself issued his version as a single, effectively smothering Iron Virgin’s recording.
Their second, and best known, single was “Rebels Rule”, from their 1974 album of the same name. It scored reasonable reviews and a variation called “Stand Up for Kenny Everett” was often played on the BBC by the DJ of the title. The song has been described as “A brilliantly bombastic ode to teenage anarchy; the single’s commercial failure is one of the great mysteries of its era. [wiki]

Iron Virgin2

The Mighty Plod were formed in May 1972 by Colchester Musician Steve Greenfield. The original line-up was Michael Natkansk (drums), Martin Newell (vocals), Carl Symanski (bass), John Fitzsimons (guitar). Their music was based on glam rocks hits of the day such as Slade and Sweet, and a selection of rock’n’roll standards like ‘Johnny B. Goode’ and ‘Shakin’ all over’ done in a fast thrash style. In 1975 the band recorded five studio tracks including the amazing ‘Neo City’. The Mighty Plod turned up again in a feature on lost treasures from the Glam Rock era, the most important bands that got away.

Hot rebell stuff from glitter era. Glam Slam thank you ma’am. Dig!!!

 

 

 

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