WHAT IT IS! Funky Soul And Rare Grooves [1967-1977]

What It Is! a

 

”Too many reissue compilations are content to merely slice ‘n’ dice familiar catalog choices in not particularly original ways. But this four-disc, 91-track trove of obscure ’70s R&B and funk from Warner-distributed labels great and small argues there’s still treasure to be gleaned from studio vaults–a five-hour groove-fest that’s as interested in shaking booty as in opening ears. Even the genre’s groundbreaking usual suspects (Wilson Pickett, the Bar-Kays, Curtis Mayfield, Earth, Wind & Fire, et al) are represented by selections that aren’t immediately familiar, while Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin serves up a radically different, previously unreleased take of “Rock Steady.” Still other stars contribute their sonic touches to some of the lesser-known cuts, as witnessed by the patent trippiness of Sly Stone alter-egos 6ix and Stanga on “I’m Just Like You” and “Little Sister,” respectively; the stark, party-not-so-hearty contrast of the Mayfield-written-and-produced “Hard Times” by Baby Huey & Baby Sisters; and the Meters’ version of “Tampin’,” released under the moniker of the Rhine Oaks.

Sequenced in rough chronological order, it’s a savvy window into a musical evolution as well, with the rhythmic guitars, organ swells, and horn flourishes of traditional ’60s R&B giving way to sinewy synths and increasingly chunky bass lines as the decade grooves on. While savvy hip-hoppers will note that many of the rarities here have already been repurposed by shrewd mixers, it’s a revelation to hear them in their original form. A compelling deconstruction of an often clichéd and too-narrowly-defined genre, this is an anthology that showcases music that has influenced such contemporary artists as Tupac, the Beastie Boys, Snoop Dogg, and Kanye West, annotated by many of the original musicians who set the dance floor in motion.” — Jerry McCulley

 

 

”This is a pretty sick compilation. It’s funkin’ awesome. You will be funkin’ all night to it. Alright no more shtick. Get it, if you love funk.”

”I am 1% cooler for having listened to this.”

”Quite possibly the finest compendium of funk one could possibly lay their ears on. Takes a while to get through and digest, but is high on accessibility and nearly perfect in quality and diversity (big names as well as guys I’ve never heard of before). Mark this one as essential.”

 ”Pimpin, Simply pimpin.”
”Basically the Nuggets of R&B, except it consistently beats its mainstream competition.  If you’re into the style, this is essential.  A good number of these are instrumentals, but that’s not a bad thing.”
What It Is! b
Funky Surfadelic, Dig!!!

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JEAN-CLAUDE PELLETIER – Streaking! [1974. Euro Funk/Lounge]

Jean-Claude Pelletier - Streaking!

 

Streakers! Streaking! Streak!

Continuing the story of 70’s Euro funk, here’s superfine ’74 ”streaking” funky slab by French composer, arranger and conductor Jean-Claude Pelletier and his orchestra. You could hear ”Special Streaking” on Funky Flea comp., and now you can taste entire lp of cool funky instro/lounge dedicated to runnin’ nude maniacs. Hello Streakers!

FUNKY FLEA vol.1 [Rare 60’s & 70’s Euro Lounge]

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Interesting non official, custom made compilation [by Space Debris] of rare 60’s & 70’s lounge, latino & funky grooves by Euro acts as Chakachas, Chicken Curry & His Pop Percussion Orchestra, 101 Strings, Chocolat’s, Nico Gomez, André Brasseur, Brasil Tropical Sound, Francis Lai, Jean-Claude Pelletier, The Chinese Fighters, The Manzanilla Sound… Sound check by Surfadelic. Cool & Sexy, Dig!

MACONDO – Macondo [1972]

MACONDO

”Discovered and produced by Sergio Mendes, Macondo was one of the more interesting, and frustrating groups to fuse Latin music, heavy rock, and funk in the wake of Santana’s huge early-’70s success. Though the band featured several able instrumentalists (particularly bassist Ron Chretin) and loads of raw energy, no one in the group was a particularly good vocalist and the unit’s songwriting was often amateurish. Consequently, none of the tracks here live up to the promise of their great introductions, grooves, and instrumental passages. Leader Max Uballez has a nice knack for melody and loads of interesting musical concepts, but the songs usually seem to be cramming in too many ideas at once. Perhaps sensing that they rocked but didn’t have anything close to a hit, on side two the group (or perhaps Mendes) decided to include Macondo’s very own “Oye Como Va” (a full two years after Abraxas) in the form of “Cayuco,” a similar Tito Puente composition. The tune sounds a bit out of place considering not a word of Spanish is sung on the entire first side of the record. Also, the arrangement is laughably Santana-esque, right down to Albert Hernandez’s lead guitar playing (which, unfortunately contains none of Carlos Santana’s virtuosity). In the end Macondo, though strictly B-list, is an enjoyable listen, as the band is so obviously having the time of their lives. Not as tight, dark, or pop-savvy as Santana or Mandrill, the group still had an appealing acid rock stoner vibe that conjures up images of a hard-partying Latin Foghat. Not exactly a lost classic, Macondo is certainly an obscurity worth looking out for and highly recommended to fans of the genre.” [Pemberton Roach, All Music Guide]

Cool rare latin-funk slab with touches of Santana and Funkadelic. Street fighting Hard-funk, Dig!!!

 

FUNKADELIC – Motor City Madness [Psych/Funk 1970-1976]

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”If you will suck my soul, I will lick your funky emotions…”

Motor City Madness is a compilation featuring songs recorded for Westbound Records during the band’s career with that label from 1968 to 1976.”

”Ah, yes. Funkadelic who do it all here. They rocked, they funked, they rhythmed & a few other things too. Eddie Hazel is a forgotten legend on lead guitar (“Maggot Brain”) & Bootsy Collins a well remembered bassist. There are only two songs here that got chart action & neither of the two were actually on the traditional Pop Singles chart. But Funkadelic was not about hits. There were about funk, partying &, in general, to use one of our more recent phrases: shock & awe. The two songs that actually charted were “A Joyful Process” which went to #38 on the Black Singles chart & “Get Off Your A** and Jam” which went to #14 on the Club Play chart. Some of the better known songs included in this collection are: “Free Your Mind and Your A** Will Follow”, “Standing on the Verge of Getting It On”, “Funky Dollar Bill”, “Cosmic Slop”, “Loose Booty”, “I Got a Thing, You Got a Thing, Everybody’s Got a Thing”, “Music For My Mother”, ”I Wanna Know If It’s Good To You”, ”I’ll Bet You”, ”You And Your Folks”, ”Mommy, What’s A Funkadelic”
This is a great collection of Funkadelic with George Clinton at the helm, sailing into waters that few groups dared to venture into. Get this and get your freak on, you freakazoids. Sure, there’s some songs missing as always on any compilation. Solution; Get all their freaking music, you maggot brain.” [amazon reviews]

 

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”Freedom is free of the need to be free,
so free your mind, and your ass will follow:
The kingdom of heaven is within…”

 

”Eeny, meeny, miney mo, catch a junkie by the toe.
If he hollers, let him go. If he don’t, do the loose booty…”

Funkadelic

Funkadelic meets Surfadelic… Detroit acid funketeers best collection after superfine singles comp. ”Music for Your Mother.” Here you got wyld bunch of acid rockers from their best period ’70-’76. Two and a half hours of Funkadelic music + Surfadelic bonus cuts. GET OFF YOUR ASS AND JAM!

 

HOWLIN’ WOLF – Message To The Young [1971] / The Back Door Wolf [1973]

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”1971 marked the release of Howlin Wolf‘s second experimental offering, ”Message To The Young” . Oft-considered his second attempt (after the ”Howlin Wolf Album” he famously shunned) at offering the masses a psychedelic record, the sound on the record ranges from acid-rock, to blues, to funk, and back again. The title track on Message To The Young is exactly what the title suggests; Wolf s attempt at reaching the youth of the era in a beautiful spoken word ballad which can easily be summed up in two words Be Yourself . Originally released on the newly formed Chess Grt label, a subsidiary of legendary imprint Chess Records.” [Amazon Editorial Review]

 

 

Another overlooked gems, this time from Howlin’ blues legend 70s rumble. ”Message To The Young” is a cool funky-blues slab in style of Muddy Waters ”After The Rain” or “Electric Mud” albums [but not so heavy], made for the new generation rockers of early 70s. You can hear influences of early Funkadelic, late period Jimmy Hendrix and even ”Beggars Banquet”/”Let it Bleed” era Stones.

The Back Door Wolf is pretty solid, straight blues effort marked Howlin’ Wolf’s return to his well known ground. Check it out!

 

 

 

 

 

SLY STONE – High On You (1975)

Sly Stone - High On You

 

”The first album attributed to Sly Stone rather than Sly & the Family Stone, High on You didn’t exactly resurrect the troubled artist’s sinking career, but it does remain one of the better straight-up funk albums of the ’70s. Released during the same mid-’70s era that spawned vibrant funk albums such as the Commodores’ Machine Gun, Parliament’s Up for the Down Stroke, and the Ohio Players’ Skin Tight, along with the first Graham Central Station albums, High on You seems like a genre exercise for Sly — rather than trailblazing new sounds like he did five years earlier, he’s now embracing the sound of the times. Still, even though Sly isn’t doing anything especially novel here, he performs an impressive series of succinct, well-crafted funk songs with plenty of pop accessibility. Indeed, High on You has the makings of a comeback album. It’s worth noting that the album’s title track was an impressive single, peaking at number three on the R&B chart and even making an appearance on the pop chart — though fairly obscure nowadays, “High on You,” remains one of Sly’s career highlights. Elsewhere, “Crossword Puzzle” stands out with its distinct horn hook and numerous background vocals (it’s become most famous for being sampled by De La Soul on 3 Feet High and Rising), while the gentle “That’s Lovin’ You,” the album’s sole ballad, cools down the proceedings for a moment. After these first three highlights, the album drops off a little, though the funk level remains well in the red. In fact, the upbeat nature of the album is perhaps its most satisfying attribute, given the downcast mood of Sly’s previous few albums. High on You doesn’t measure up to the best Sly & the Family Stone albums of the late ’60s and early ’70s, granted, but it’s a step up in quality from Small Talk and certainly all that would follow. Long written off and long out of print, High on You is an underrated album that deserves re-evaluation” [allmusic]

 

Sly Stone - High On You2

 

Hey folks, are you ready for little bit o’ funk ?

Cool, somehow overlooked slab from my favorite funkster. Even thought ”I Get High On You” was a hit back then, over the years lp passed under the radar for some Family Stone’s fans, me too. This is Sly’s last fine record, continuing the same Funk/Pop groove in style of ”Fresh” and ”Small Talk”. Only for ‘Quadraphonic’ audio equipment 🙂  Le Lo Li !!!

 

Quel Organ!

Quel Organ! a

“30 cm de Plaisirs French Organ Jerks”

Real COOL French 60’s Mod/Lounge/Funky/Instro compilation with some movies excerpts between the trax [reminds pretty much on legendary “Wavy Gravy” concept]. Hammond organs & fuzz guits dominated sexy dance tunes. And just to explain the pic: Miss “Pretty Baby” is on the left, Mr.E is on the right. C’ex!

01. Christian Gaubert – Autoroute Du Sud
02. George Feeling – Pulsation
03. Francis Lopez – La Honte De La Famille
04. Roger Pierre Et Jean Marc Thibault – Boof!
05. Les Sparks – Palladium
06. Stephane Varegues Et Georges Van Parys – Le Salon De The
07. The Heathen Blues – Up In The Air
08. Les Guitares Du Dimanche – Sur Une Nappe De Restaurant
09. Mickey Nicholas – Free State
10. George Delerue – Carnaby Street
11. Louis Marischal – Tu Me Tapes Sur Les Nerfs
12. Michel Polnareff & Annie Girardot – La Femme Aux Faux-Cils
13. Francois De Roubaix – I Want To Suggest
14. Philippe Nicaud – C’ex

!!! FUNKY BROADWAY !!!

”Dyke & the Blazers were one of the first acts possibly the first notable act to play funk other than James Brown. Indeed, they often sounded like a sort of junior version of Brown and the JB’s, playing songs in which the rhythms and riffs mattered more than the tune. Similarly, vocalist Dyke Christian sang/grunted words that mattered more for the feeling and rhythm than the content. Their best-known track, “Funky Broadway, ” was covered for a bigger hit by Wilson Pickett, though Dyke & the Blazers got a few more R&B hits before Dyke was shot to death in 1971.”
Subtitled The Ultimate Broadway Funk, no one’s going to beat this as the ultimate Dyke & the Blazers compilation. The two-CD, two-hour-and-20-minute set has everything they released on 45 or LP between 1967-1970, including unedited full-length versions of seven of their singles, no less than 13 previously unissued tracks, and even some radio station promos.

It could be that less intense funk/Dyke fans might wish for a more succinct single-disc comp concentrating on the official singles, especially as, like many single-artist funk anthologies, the grooves get a little similar-sounding over the course of two-plus hours. Then again, if you like the group enough to get a Dyke & the Blazers collection in the first place, you might well be the type who thrives on such lengthy dwellings on the primeval funk groove. And as such grooves went, few were better (and very few artists, if any other than James Brown, did them earlier) or earthier than Dyke & the Blazers, even if it turns out that session musicians (including members of the Watts 103rd Street Rhythm Band) often played the parts of the Blazers in the studio.

The anthology is conveniently divided into one disc of their 1966-1967 sessions (all held in Phoenix, where the band was based at the time) and a second of their 1968-1970 sessions (which all took place in Hollywood), though the quality remains consistent throughout. That counts the many unreleased tracks, which are generally up to the standard of what the band officially released, including some (like the ultra-kinetic — if marred by some out-of-tune horns — &”She Knows It,” the upbeat “Let’s Do It Together,” and the untypical serious ballad “Why Am I Treated So Funky Bad?”) that would have ranked among their more interesting efforts had they been issued at the time.” [Richie Unterberger]
If you want your funk long, dirty & uncut, this is fer ya. Dyke gonna funk you long time. Stay in the groove!
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IT’S HAPPENING Vol.1,2,3 [Forgotten Dancer Treasures]

Interesting mix of some rare late 60’s/early 70’s Mod, Soul, Funk, Bubblegum, Lounge dance tunes. There are more volumes in this fun vinyl only series but I got only these. Well, IT’S what’s HAPPENING!!!
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01. Rick Mcphail – Introduction
02. Paul Revere & The Raiders – It’s Happening
03. Ernie Garrett – Eleanor Rigby
04. Cliff Nobles – The Horse
05. Luther Ingram – I Spy (For The F.B.I.)
06. Roland Kirk – Making Love After Hours
07. Georgie Fame – Seventh Son
08. The Nirvana Sitar & String Group – The Letter
09. Jonathan King – Let It All Hang Out
10. Jack Mcduff – Wade In The Water
11. Oscar Brown Jr. – The Snake
12. The Capitols – Tired Running From You
13. Chubby Checker – (At The) Discotheque
14. Jacques Dutronc – A La Queue Les Yvelines
15. Unknown Artist – Harter Tag (Bonus Track)
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01. Rick McPhail – Introduction
02. Eddie Carlton – Things Are Getting A Little Tougher
03. Trax 4 – Coming Home Baby
04. The Shadows Of Knight – Run Run Billy Porter
05. Mose Allison – I’m Not Talking
06. Lonnie Satin – Soul Bossa Nova
07. Knut Kiesewetter – Stop Stop Stop
08. James & Bobby Purify – I Take What I Want
09. Brian Bennet – Sunny Afternoon
10. Alexander Stone – Man In The Suitcase
11. Bobby More – Hey Mr. DJ
12. The Cavaliers – Hold To My Baby
13. Bob Seger & The Last Heard – East Side Story
14. HET – Keije Nagan
15. Unknown Artist – Bonus Track
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01. The Impressions – The Young Mods Forgotten Story
02. Chuck Jackson – I Only Get This Feeling
03. The Village Callers – I Don’t Need No Doctor
04. Billy Hawks – Let Me Love You Before You Go
05. The Redcaps – Talkin’ Bout You
06. Little Esther Phillips – Cherry Wine
07. Jackie Wilson – Light My Fire
08. New Dawn – Slave Of Desire
09. The Zombies – Summertime
10. Pucho – Cantaloop Island
11. Billy Larkin – Hold On I’m Coming
12. Roy Hamilton – You Shook Me Up
13. Shirley Ellis – Sugar Let’s Shing-A-Ling
14. Unknown Artist – Bonus Track
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