DEFUNKT – Thermonuclear Sweat [1982] Vinyl Rip!!!

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”Defunkt is a musical group founded by trombonist/singer Joseph Bowie 1978. in New York City. They merge avant-garde aesthetics with punk rock and funk, and have produced 15 recordings on various independent labels.” [wiki]

Whoa children, ain’t it hot today? It’s perfect time for ”Thermonuclear Sweat”, one of my favorite funk slabs. This is Defunkt’s 2nd LP and probably their best, full of high energy/nuclear jazz funk tunes as Avoid The Funk, Illusion, I Tried To Live Alone, For The Love Of Mone, Believing In Love… They were connected to James Chance/White and were one of the main influences for early Red Hot Chili Peppers. Vinyl rip by Surfadelic. Ooh Baby… Dig!!!

 

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TONY JOE WHITE – Voodoo Village [Surfadelic Collection]

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”They say your village lies
In the western part of town
And that evil spirits are lurking all around
But I’m not scared of you
For evil can be found
Looking almost anywhere not just in voodoo town…”

”Tony Joe White is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, best known for his 1969 hit “Polk Salad Annie” and for “Rainy Night in Georgia”, which he wrote but was first made popular by Brook Benton in 1970. Dusty Springfield reached the charts with White’s “Willie and Laura Mae Jones”. He also wrote “Steamy Windows” and “Undercover Agent for the Blues”, both hits for Tina Turner in 1989; those two songs came by way of Turner’s producer at the time, Mark Knopfler, who is a friend of White. “Polk Salad Annie” was also recorded by Elvis Presley and Tom Jones.” [wiki]

This is a Surfadelic tribute to favorite swamp rock maestro from bayous of Oak Grove, Louisiana. With powerful Elvis like baritone voise and wyld wah-wah guitar playin’, Tony made his own brand of voodoo/funky/soul music. Just check out tunes as Stud Spider, Even Trolls Love Rock And Roll, Don’t Steal My Love, Elements And Things, Soul Francisco or Voodoo Village and you’ll know what I’m talking about. He also did some great covers of Reddings ‘‘Hard To Handle”, Dale Hawkin’s ”Susie Q” and Johnnie Taylor’s ”Who’s Making Love”. This collection covers White’s recordings from 1968 to 1976 for Monument and Warner Bros. records. Surfadelic got soul! Dig!!!

 

”Down in Louisiana, where the alligators grow so mean
There lived a girl, that I swear to the world
Made the alligators look tame…”
[Polk salad Annie]

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I MARC 4 – The Psych Jazzy Beat Of I Marc 4 [Italian 60’s/70’s Lounge]

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“Italian soundtracks from the late 60s to mid 70s are practically a genre to themselves and have long been a treasure trove for those who seek unique jazzy psychedelic beats. The Psych Jazzy Beat of I Marc 4, features the music of one of the top recording quartets of Italian soundtracks, I Marc 4. The members of this quartet all came from a jazz background and originally grouped together in the mid-60s with the purpose of supporting various high profile vocalists. The backing band to the most admired composers of the ’70s, from Ennio Morricone to Piero Umiliani, I Marc 4 had a unique “Italian soundtrack” style. I Marc 4 recorded several albums on their Nelson label between 1970 and 1976, featuring Antonello Vannucchi‘s incredible use of his Hammond C3, Roberto Podio‘s kicking rhythm section, and the legendary Maurizio Maiorana on bass, not to forget the real soul of the band, their guitar player, Carlo Pes. In the late 60s they moved on to being soundtrack composers whose instrumental works would then be collected and released on LPs. Psychedelic rock, soul jazz, brassy Herb Alpert style numbers, spacey exotic lounge music, goofy country funk, proto-progressive rock are the easily recognizable genres coexisting in this retrospective of one of the most hidden treasures of the Italian psych-jazz scene.”

 

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WHAT IT IS! Funky Soul And Rare Grooves [1967-1977]

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”Too many reissue compilations are content to merely slice ‘n’ dice familiar catalog choices in not particularly original ways. But this four-disc, 91-track trove of obscure ’70s R&B and funk from Warner-distributed labels great and small argues there’s still treasure to be gleaned from studio vaults–a five-hour groove-fest that’s as interested in shaking booty as in opening ears. Even the genre’s groundbreaking usual suspects (Wilson Pickett, the Bar-Kays, Curtis Mayfield, Earth, Wind & Fire, et al) are represented by selections that aren’t immediately familiar, while Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin serves up a radically different, previously unreleased take of “Rock Steady.” Still other stars contribute their sonic touches to some of the lesser-known cuts, as witnessed by the patent trippiness of Sly Stone alter-egos 6ix and Stanga on “I’m Just Like You” and “Little Sister,” respectively; the stark, party-not-so-hearty contrast of the Mayfield-written-and-produced “Hard Times” by Baby Huey & Baby Sisters; and the Meters’ version of “Tampin’,” released under the moniker of the Rhine Oaks.

Sequenced in rough chronological order, it’s a savvy window into a musical evolution as well, with the rhythmic guitars, organ swells, and horn flourishes of traditional ’60s R&B giving way to sinewy synths and increasingly chunky bass lines as the decade grooves on. While savvy hip-hoppers will note that many of the rarities here have already been repurposed by shrewd mixers, it’s a revelation to hear them in their original form. A compelling deconstruction of an often clichéd and too-narrowly-defined genre, this is an anthology that showcases music that has influenced such contemporary artists as Tupac, the Beastie Boys, Snoop Dogg, and Kanye West, annotated by many of the original musicians who set the dance floor in motion.” — Jerry McCulley

 

 

”This is a pretty sick compilation. It’s funkin’ awesome. You will be funkin’ all night to it. Alright no more shtick. Get it, if you love funk.”

”I am 1% cooler for having listened to this.”

”Quite possibly the finest compendium of funk one could possibly lay their ears on. Takes a while to get through and digest, but is high on accessibility and nearly perfect in quality and diversity (big names as well as guys I’ve never heard of before). Mark this one as essential.”

 ”Pimpin, Simply pimpin.”
”Basically the Nuggets of R&B, except it consistently beats its mainstream competition.  If you’re into the style, this is essential.  A good number of these are instrumentals, but that’s not a bad thing.”
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Funky Surfadelic, Dig!!!

JEAN-CLAUDE PELLETIER – Streaking! [1974. Euro Funk/Lounge]

Jean-Claude Pelletier - Streaking!

 

Streakers! Streaking! Streak!

Continuing the story of 70’s Euro funk, here’s superfine ’74 ”streaking” funky slab by French composer, arranger and conductor Jean-Claude Pelletier and his orchestra. You could hear ”Special Streaking” on Funky Flea comp., and now you can taste entire lp of cool funky instro/lounge dedicated to runnin’ nude maniacs. Hello Streakers!

FUNKY FLEA vol.1 [Rare 60’s & 70’s Euro Lounge]

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Interesting non official, custom made compilation [by Space Debris] of rare 60’s & 70’s lounge, latino & funky grooves by Euro acts as Chakachas, Chicken Curry & His Pop Percussion Orchestra, 101 Strings, Chocolat’s, Nico Gomez, André Brasseur, Brasil Tropical Sound, Francis Lai, Jean-Claude Pelletier, The Chinese Fighters, The Manzanilla Sound… Sound check by Surfadelic. Cool & Sexy, Dig!

MACONDO – Macondo [1972]

MACONDO

”Discovered and produced by Sergio Mendes, Macondo was one of the more interesting, and frustrating groups to fuse Latin music, heavy rock, and funk in the wake of Santana’s huge early-’70s success. Though the band featured several able instrumentalists (particularly bassist Ron Chretin) and loads of raw energy, no one in the group was a particularly good vocalist and the unit’s songwriting was often amateurish. Consequently, none of the tracks here live up to the promise of their great introductions, grooves, and instrumental passages. Leader Max Uballez has a nice knack for melody and loads of interesting musical concepts, but the songs usually seem to be cramming in too many ideas at once. Perhaps sensing that they rocked but didn’t have anything close to a hit, on side two the group (or perhaps Mendes) decided to include Macondo’s very own “Oye Como Va” (a full two years after Abraxas) in the form of “Cayuco,” a similar Tito Puente composition. The tune sounds a bit out of place considering not a word of Spanish is sung on the entire first side of the record. Also, the arrangement is laughably Santana-esque, right down to Albert Hernandez’s lead guitar playing (which, unfortunately contains none of Carlos Santana’s virtuosity). In the end Macondo, though strictly B-list, is an enjoyable listen, as the band is so obviously having the time of their lives. Not as tight, dark, or pop-savvy as Santana or Mandrill, the group still had an appealing acid rock stoner vibe that conjures up images of a hard-partying Latin Foghat. Not exactly a lost classic, Macondo is certainly an obscurity worth looking out for and highly recommended to fans of the genre.” [Pemberton Roach, All Music Guide]

Cool rare latin-funk slab with touches of Santana and Funkadelic. Street fighting Hard-funk, Dig!!!