PEBBLES VOL.4 (revisited !!!)

pebbles vol 4

 

Alright kiddies, this ain’t another 60’s garage rock volume but fun collection of surf pop tunes dominated by Gary Usher/Brian Wilson style productions, kinda like a black sheep in Pebbles series.

“Simply put: This is a collection of vocal surf music, including some singers and players in the Beach Boys/Jan & Dean orbit. This set is not for those looking to get their feet wet (pun intended) in surf music, but for FANATICS, this is a treasure trove. The track by Dave Edmunds is alone worth owning this set for — it’s his version of The Tradewinds’ “NY is a Lonely Town” with the lyrics changed to London and the plight of a surfer boy that moved to England. Not every song is a gem — some stuff is obscure for a reason — but most of it is dandy, silly, enthusiastic surfin’ fun!”

“As its title implies, the fourth Pebbles volume is a bit of a departure from other volumes in the series. It serves up 18 tracks of ultra obscure surf rock from the 60s (except for Dave Edmunds’ “London’s A Lonely Town,” which was recorded in 1973). The songs are mostly from the poppier end of the spectrum, with vocal harmonies, symplistic lyrics, and peppy instrumentation that shows a clear Beach Boys/Jan & Dean influence. Severeal of these songs are really good- The Dantes’ “Top Down Time” is an infectious rush, and the Knights’ “Hot Rod High” offers the kind of simplistic joy that its title promises. The Wheel Men and The Super Stocks provide two excellent versions of the same song (with slighty different titles, however. The former group calls their tune “School Is A Gas,” while the latter provides “School Is A Drag”). Lloyd Thaxton’s “Image Of A Surfer” can almost be described as the surf-pop counterpart to Kim Fowley’s “The Trip.”

Listen up surfers! This is a DEFINITIVE version of now a classic 1979. Pebbles surfin’ LP collection, with perfect HQ sound mastered from best possible sources. In visual sound Surfadelic! Dig!!!

 

pebbles vol 4bpebbles vol 4c

(((0)))

TOM & JERRY vs BRUCE & TERRY [60’s Surf/Pop]

Tom & Jerry - 1963 - Surfin' Hootenanny a

”Meet TOM & JERRY – no, not the cartoon cat & mouse, but two widely respected Country session guitarists.
TOM TOMLINSON had worked on the Louisiana Hayride in the early 50s and carved out a reputation as a hot session guitarist, before joining Johnny Horton’s band – he played on all Horton’s hits.
JERRY KENNEDY had been a successful 13-year old Rockabilly singer, ‘Jerry Glenn’, before also joining the Louisiana Hayride house band, eventually becoming a Nashville ‘A’ Team regular at the age of just seventeen.
They teamed up in early 60’s to record four instrumental albums for Mercury Records. The albums entitled “Tom & Jerry”, cover all genres of music, also included Hank Garland, Boots Randolph, Bob Moore, and Harold Bradley.
Jerry Kennedy Orchestra participate to the complete sessions recording for Johnny Hallyday in 1962. Kennedy was one of the session musicians used by Bob Dylan in recording his classic album, Blonde On Blonde in 1966.

This ’63 surf styled lp among instros has some girls singing tunes as well known Lee Hazlewood ”Surfin’ Hootenanny”[also recorded by Al Casey]. – As requested

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”Best known for their hits as the Rip Chords, the vocal duo of Bruce Johnston and Terry Melcher collaborated on countless hot-rod and surf records during the mid-1960s, working under a seemingly endless variety of studio guises. While Johnston was already a well-known West Coast session player, Melcher (the son of Doris Day) had released a series of singles under the name Terry Day before being named Columbia Records’ youngest-ever staff producer; he brought Johnston to the company to release 1963’s ”Surfin’ Round the World”, and the pair soon began collaborating regularly. As the Rip Chords, they scored their biggest hit with 1964’s “Hey Little Cobra; ” a series of singles credited to Bruce and Terry followed before the duo went their separate ways, with Johnston joining the Beach Boys and Melcher enjoying even greater success as a producer.” [allmusic]

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