DEAN CARTER vs STUD COLE [60’s Garage/Psychobilly/Blues]

Dean Carter - Call Of The Wild !!

”Dean Carter was a true oddity of ’60s rock. He was a singer-guitarist with the heart and much of the sound of a ’50s rockabilly wildman, yet he recorded music that updated that rockabilly spirit with ’60s garage rock and dashes of soul, and even a bit of psychedelia here and there. Carter didn’t put out a whole lot of records in the ’60s, and those he did put out were heard by few. Yet one of those singles in particular, 1967’s “Jailhouse Rock”/”Rebel Woman” (on the small Milky Way label), is highly valued by ’60s garage collectors, even if its rockabilly influence made it a little anachronistic. Carter also did a good deal of unreleased sessions of considerable quality, whether he was playing relatively straight rockabilly or his freakier hybrid of rockabilly with late-’60s sounds. Much material from those sessions came to light on the fine Big Beat 2002 CD release Call of the Wild.

Dean Carter

Carter was born Arlie Neaville and began playing rockabilly in the late ’50s in Champaign, IL, where he remained based for much of the ’60s. He recorded for the Ping label in 1961 under his real name, on the more established Fraternity label in 1962 as Arlie Nevil, and then for Limelight as Dean Carter in 1964. That same year, he and Arlie Miller, a member of his band the Lucky Ones, started a home studio in Danville, IL to record both Carter and other musicians. The pair also ran the small Milky Way label, which released product by Carter and others. At times the sessions got pretty strange even by garage rock standards, with ukulele, accordion, dobro, and clarinet all heard in addition to the usual crunchy guitars on his outrageous cover of Elvis Presley’s “Jailhouse Rock.”

Dean Carter - Wild!

Carter went to the West Coast for a while in the late ’60s, recording a couple of singles in Washington State with Gene Vincent guitarist Jerry Merritt, for Merritt’s Tell International label. He returned to the Midwest at the end of the decade to resume recording with Miller, and went back to billing himself as Arlie Neaville on record. In the early ’70s, he went into gospel music, where he’s remained ever since.” [allmusic]

 

Stud Cole

”He’s been described as “Jack Starr meets Johnny Kidd”, “a lysergic Conway Twitty” and “Elvis fronting the ’66 Yardbirds” but mere words can’t truly describe the unique sounds of the late, great Stud Cole!”

””The late, great Stud Cole’s 1968 promo only LP (only 100 copies made in 1968) with five bonus cuts gives Los Angeles’ ultimate loner icon a fitting tribute as his memory is perceived in the digital age. Starting off with the title track, Cole’s Burn Baby Burn sounds timeless, a welcomed escape from the modern glut of over produced, emotion-deprived recordings. Cole’s fusion of 60’s rock and gritty country still sounds years ahead of its time, his seductive singing style alluring, its tough boy approach fitting for the rock and country he creates.” [Alex Steininger]

”Lounge flavored garage, with rock-a-billy influences, Elvis-like vocals, and fuzz guitar, all over blues/psych mat’l. This is one unusual album, originally issued as a demo only in 1968. The artist’s real name was Pat Tirone, and he was a bartender from L.A.”

 

 

What to say about those two wyldmen weirdos of Rock’n’Roll? It’s a double dose of 60’s garage, r-billy/blues/psych lunacy and mayhem the way it shoulda be… or what? Anyways, I’ve already have posted these real cool cats, two wacko garage surfadelic favs and I do it again. If you like acts as Hasil Adkins and The Cramps this is for you. And yeah, check this one too – Kookie Cook [a friend of Dean Carter] Burn Baby Burn!

 

 

MESSERSCHMITT – Shake That Thing [1993]

Messerschmitt - Shake That Thing1

Great follow up to their 1990. killer debut slab. Opening with high-octane [maybe a definitive] cover of Stones classic “Jumpin Jack Flash”, MESSERSCHMITT takes you for one hell of a ride through Flamin’ Groovies, NY Dolls, Motorhead style highway rockers. With turbo jet originals as She Gives To Me Free, Floating In The Air, Jim Beam Boogie Stomp, Snowflake and cool covers of blues classics of Muddy Waters – I Just Want To Make Love To You , Howlin’ Wolf – Little Red Rooster and J.Lee Hooker – Big Legs, Tight Skirt, gonna have you on yer knees beggin’ for more. Maximum garage-blues-punk highway rock!!!

Messerschmitt - Shake That Thing2

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THE PRIMEVALS – On The Red Eye [1984-2000]

Garage Punk band from Glasgow, Scotland founded in ’83. Their slide guitar blues punk styleremind much on The GUN CLUB but with Scottish kink. This collection gathers their best stuff from 80’s as well as some unreleased tunes. It’s a Primeval call, Dig!
Tracks 1-1 to 1-11 from Sound Hole  LP [1986]
Tracks 1-12, 1-13 from  Elixir Of Life  7”[1986]
Tracks 1-14 to 1-19 from Eternal Hotfire LP [1984]
Tracks 1-10, 1-21 from Living In Hell  7”[1985]
Tracks 2-1 to 2-12 from Live A Little  LP [1987]
Track 2-13 from compilation Play New Rose For Me  [1986]
Tracks 2-14 to 2-15 from Heya  7”[1987]
Track 2-16 is on the tribute to Captain Beefheart Fast ‘N’ Bulbous  [1988]
Tracks 17 to 2-20 previously unreleased, recorded in Cava Studio, Glasgow 27/2/2000

THE GORIES – I Know You Fine, But How You Doin’ [1990] Vinyl Rip!!!

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“This here’s the Gories from Detroit, hot of the press.
It’s gonna jump on you baby and it’s gonna stay in your dress.
Here it comes!”
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“After a slew of singles and one beautifully realized yet chaotic album, The Gories went to Memphis, Tennessee in 1990 to record an album at Easley Recording. The man they enlisted to helm the record was none other than Alex Chilton, formerly of the Boxtops, Big Star, and Tav Falco’s Panther Burns — an avowed rock deconstructionist who had produced the Cramps psychobilly classic, Songs the Lord Taught us.

I Know You Fine opens with a lyrically poetic and antiquated sounding DJ’s shout-out from days passed: “This here’s the Gories from Detroit; hot of the press. It’s gonna jump on you baby and it’s gonna stay in your dress. Here it comes!” And then the first song, “Hey Hey, We’re the Gories,” scratches along, playfully aping, you guessed it, The Monkees. The slightly lascivious “You Make it Move” follows, buoyed by a fuzzy, livewire guitar line and the primal, repetitive thud of what sounds like a disabused oil drum.

Coherency is one of The Gories’ strong suits. Trying to hold such disparate influences together — Guitar Slim, Chuck Berry, Link Wray, Bo Diddley, Suicide, Joy Division, The Sonics, in a slight way, Hendrix and voodoo — could make for a messy affair, but The Gories are masters at holding many contrasting sounds together at once.

The album is top to bottom nearly flawless sly and impish garage punk, shot through with minimalist deconstructionism and is built perfectly around the flinty, abrasive and subtly textured twin guitars of Collins and Kroha. O’Neil is the minimalist foil that drives each song — try finding another band, aside from perhaps Neu!, with a drummer who so thoroughly disregards the practice of doing “fills” and makes practically no rhythmic changes.There are four stand out songs: The impeccably literate “Thunderbird ESQ,” a song about a guy wedded more to his fortified wine than his female companion, “Smashed,” about, well you can probably figure it out, the desperate “View From Here,” and, probably their most famous song, which is not saying much, “Nitroglycerine,” a particularly sweaty song, essentially about having sex and fighting. The Gories put out one more album, the aptly titled Outta Here (1992), and then broke up.” [blogcritics.org]

Blues-Garage-Punk masterpiece, now in Surfadelic Stereo Vinyl Rip! Includes ”Queenie”[not on CD]. Nitroglycerine!!!360>
”I’m going out gonna get my girl
Gonna go to the store buy some Thunderbird
Gonna get my car find some place to be alone
We gon’ start drinking ’til it’s all gone…”
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GREG ‘STACKHOUSE’ PREVOST – Mississippi Murderer [2013]

Debut solo album for Ex Chesterfield Kings frontmen. Raw Stonesy [Exile On Main Stree-era] punk blues with NY Dolls/Johnny Thunders vibes and attitude. Cool originals and covers of Stones [I Ain’t Signifying], Donovan [Hey Gyp], Robert Johnson [Ramblin’ On My Mind], Skip James [Hard Time Killing Floor Blues], Blind Willie Johnson [John The Revelator] and fine homage to Yardbirds [Downstate New Yawk Blooze]. One of the best rockin’ slabs in last few years. Dig!!!
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