THE RED RYDERS / THE SHIN-DIGGERS / THE SOUL REPS [’60s R&B Instro/Lounge]

The Red Ryders front

 

 

Three obscure records from the same year of 1964. The Red Ryders was Rhythm & Blues instrumental group from Ohio. Their sole Lp produced by Quincy Jones is solid all instro venture with couple of vocal tunes. The Shin-Diggers 4 trax Ep been taken from ABC TV show Shindig! with cool tunes dubbed with fake live audience. The Soul Reps, obcure Swedish beat group did two fine instro tunes ”Soul Food” in Booker T. & the M.G.’s style, and ”Shamus O’toole’‘ cover of The Spotnicks. Rare stuff, Vinyl rip, Dig!!!

 

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Guitar Ace – Link Wray Tribute + Think Link! 1&2

 

Guitarace

“Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? The Shadow knows!”

”24 scrappy garage,surf, and punk artists from across the globe contribute versions of popular and obscure Link Wray nuggets, proving that his music transcends cultures, ages, genres, and trends. With a sufficiently primitive approach and more vocals than you might expect from someone best-known for his instrumentals, ringers like The Fleshtones (blitzing though a minute-and-45-second, raucous beach party rave-up of “Soul Train”), Southern Culture on the Skids (grinding out “I’m Branded” with lo-fi raw power) and Calexico (the lovely “Fallin’ Rain” is this album’s least-frantic cut) rub elbows with lesser-known yet talented bands; all of whom deftly capture Wray’s eclectic musical personas. From the reverbed, spaghetti western twang of The Hellbenders “The Outlaw,” The Space Cossacks “Mustang,” and Boston’s Four Piece Suit “Roughshod,” to variations on the “Rumble” theme courtesy of an international crew featuring Belgium’s Fifty Foot Combo (“Slinky”), Finland’s The Downers (“Genocide”), and the Scandinavian ad-hoc group Spy-Fi (“The Shadow Knows”), Guitar Ace leaves few Wray guns holstered. Excursions into surf (San Francisco’s Pollo Del Mar‘s frantic “Jack the Ripper”) country (Deke Dickerson & The Eco-Fonics finds his inner Ricky Nelson on “Run Boy Run”), and poppy garage rock (The Gore Gore Girls run “Baby Doll” through the Shangri-Las’ tough but tender wringer) show how Wray was far from a one-chord pony.”[Hal Horowitz]

Guitar Ace plus two 10” vinyl ”Thin Link” volumes add up to the total tribute post to the king of power chord. Featuring instrumental action by 90’s garage/surf revival acts as The Galaxy Trio, Mono Men, The Volcanos, Thee Headcoat Sect, Impala, The Phantom 5ive, Huevos Rancheros, Man Or Astroman…   Think… Link!!!

 

”It’s not fair to judge a man by the color of his skin,
or the size of his wallet, but rather the number
of Link Wray records he owns.”

 

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Psychedellic Guitars/Guitars A Go Go [60’s Instrumentals]

 

This is basically songs by a session man Jerry Cole and The Stingers under different titles, and guitars are maybe a go-go but certainly ain’t psychedelic. Although issued in ’67, ”Psychedellic Guitars” [notice double ‘L’] is actually ’64 ”Guitars A Go Go” Lp, and More Psychedellic Guitars is actually ’66 ”A Go Go Guitars” Lp with different trax order and titles. And yeah! There’s also ’69 Electric Firebirds ”Dance Party Time” Lp simmilar to More Psychedellic Guitars. It’s a bit confusing and misleading but that’s the way with many exploatation albums. Anyways, don’t worry everything’s here. Cool surf/lounge instro stuff, vinyl rips, Dig!!!

 

 

 

MARY JANE [1968. Soundtrack w/ Davie Allan & The Arrows]

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This isn’t one of those 60’s biker flicks soundtracks but nevertheless it’s cool and includes involvement of Davie Allan & The Arrows as session musicians. You can hear ’em on fine rumblin’ tunes as The Fun Zone, Pursuit or Bay City Boys [known as ”Grogs Hog” from ”Cycle-Delic Sounds Of” LP]. Movie is a drama about teacher trying to break up a local drug ring who is framed and arrested for possession of marijuana, featuring teen idol Fabian. ”Fabian plays a high school art teacher who is framed and busted while trying to convince the school principal that grass isn’t such a bad thing. Diane McBain plays a fellow teacher who has her own problems to deal with. The rebellious students are about as threatening as a teenage root beer bust.” Album produced by Mike Curb and Lawrence Brown, Mary Jane music score by Mike Curb and Lawrence Brown. Duophonic vinyl rip, Dig!!!

 

WES DAKUS & THE REBELS – Surfadelic Collection [Canuck 60’s Instro/Garage Rock]

Wes Dakus & The Rebels

 

”Wes Dakus was the band leader of “Club 93 Rebels”, Canada’s most influential and popular instrumental group of the 1960s.
Wes Dakus & The Club 93 Rebels formed in 1958 and often interchanged personnel with Edmonton’s Nomads. They were signed to Quality Records in 1960 and released “El Ringo” that year. Touring as the backing act for several other prominant artists, including Buddy Knox, which established the band as seasoned professionals allowing them to record material as Wes Dakus & The Rebels with famed producer Norman Petty (Roy Orbison, kd lang) starting in 1962. Later sessions in 1964 also produced recordings for Dakus himself and erstwhile member Barry Allen’s side project as a solo artist. There were also singles released under the name The Dundeeville Players featuring guitarist George Tomsco.
Club 93 Rebels included Barry Allen (guitar, Vocalss), Bob Clarke (guitar), Stu Mitchell (drums) and Dennis Paul (bass).
In 1965 ‘The Wes Dakus Album – With The Rebels’ was released on Capitol and spawned several singles including “Hobo” and “Come On Down”. In 1966 an album of additional tracks was issued on KAPP in the US as “Wes Dakus’s Rebels”. In Canada the album was not released but split into several individual singles as solo recordings for the band’s various members including Wes Dakus, Stu Mitchell, Barry Allen and Dennis Paul.
RPM Magazine voted Wes Dakus & The Rebels Canada’s “Top Instrumental Group” in 1964 and 1965.”

 

 

 

Collection of 1960-1968 singles and lp recordings by this Edmonton rockin’ crew. You could hear ’em on ”Forbidden City Dog Food” and other 60’s garage comps as ”Get Ready To Fly”, ”That’s Swift” or ”Early Canadian Rockers”. Here you got instrumental tunes, garage fuzz rockers and psych track as ”Acid”. All in all, 30 trax of Canaduh 60’s R’n’R ! Say… Dig!!!

 

v.a. FORBIDDEN CITY DOG FOOD [50s & 60s Instro/R&B/Trash/Exotica + Movie Trailers]

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”Uhoh Baby ! Legendary…One of the very first of Lux Interior’s Vip Vop Tapes to make it onto vinyl way back in the late 1980’s…..This is a limited edition pressing from the USA, the original 1st pressings say Australia (Like the Born Bad series)…..Crazed mix of Rockabilly, Surf, movie clips and a dash of R&B !….Just what the good Dr ordered! Get it while you can!”

Lux’s warm up tape, similar concept to ”Wavy Gravy” with great ridiculous horror & trash flics trailers between [mostly instro tittyshakin’] trax. Don’t miss it! Do The Pig! Dig!!!

 

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PHANTOM GUITARS vol.1&2 [UK 60’s Twangin’ Instros]

 

”In the three year span between Rock & Roll and the full flush of Beat, guitar-led instrumental groups took control of the UK. In the wake of The Shadows and their magical brand of twanging melody, coffee bars, dancehalls and fairgrounds reverberated to the sound of Binson echo units and primitive Bigsby-esque tremolo arms…”

”The instrumental rock scene was a vitally important part of the rise of homegrown British rock, and if this deals in obscurities rather than hits, Phantom Guitars documents how pervasive this sound once was, and how many great pickers were making the rounds in the early ’60s.”
[Mark Deming]

Two Real COOL instrumental comps made by Nick Saloman of the Bevis Frond. If you dig The Shadows, Duane Eddy and Joe Meek style instros, this is fer ya.

 

WHAT IT IS! Funky Soul And Rare Grooves [1967-1977]

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”Too many reissue compilations are content to merely slice ‘n’ dice familiar catalog choices in not particularly original ways. But this four-disc, 91-track trove of obscure ’70s R&B and funk from Warner-distributed labels great and small argues there’s still treasure to be gleaned from studio vaults–a five-hour groove-fest that’s as interested in shaking booty as in opening ears. Even the genre’s groundbreaking usual suspects (Wilson Pickett, the Bar-Kays, Curtis Mayfield, Earth, Wind & Fire, et al) are represented by selections that aren’t immediately familiar, while Queen of Soul Aretha Franklin serves up a radically different, previously unreleased take of “Rock Steady.” Still other stars contribute their sonic touches to some of the lesser-known cuts, as witnessed by the patent trippiness of Sly Stone alter-egos 6ix and Stanga on “I’m Just Like You” and “Little Sister,” respectively; the stark, party-not-so-hearty contrast of the Mayfield-written-and-produced “Hard Times” by Baby Huey & Baby Sisters; and the Meters’ version of “Tampin’,” released under the moniker of the Rhine Oaks.

Sequenced in rough chronological order, it’s a savvy window into a musical evolution as well, with the rhythmic guitars, organ swells, and horn flourishes of traditional ’60s R&B giving way to sinewy synths and increasingly chunky bass lines as the decade grooves on. While savvy hip-hoppers will note that many of the rarities here have already been repurposed by shrewd mixers, it’s a revelation to hear them in their original form. A compelling deconstruction of an often clichéd and too-narrowly-defined genre, this is an anthology that showcases music that has influenced such contemporary artists as Tupac, the Beastie Boys, Snoop Dogg, and Kanye West, annotated by many of the original musicians who set the dance floor in motion.” — Jerry McCulley

 

 

”This is a pretty sick compilation. It’s funkin’ awesome. You will be funkin’ all night to it. Alright no more shtick. Get it, if you love funk.”

”I am 1% cooler for having listened to this.”

”Quite possibly the finest compendium of funk one could possibly lay their ears on. Takes a while to get through and digest, but is high on accessibility and nearly perfect in quality and diversity (big names as well as guys I’ve never heard of before). Mark this one as essential.”

 ”Pimpin, Simply pimpin.”
”Basically the Nuggets of R&B, except it consistently beats its mainstream competition.  If you’re into the style, this is essential.  A good number of these are instrumentals, but that’s not a bad thing.”
What It Is! b
Funky Surfadelic, Dig!!!

JEAN-CLAUDE PELLETIER – Streaking! [1974. Euro Funk/Lounge]

Jean-Claude Pelletier - Streaking!

 

Streakers! Streaking! Streak!

Continuing the story of 70’s Euro funk, here’s superfine ’74 ”streaking” funky slab by French composer, arranger and conductor Jean-Claude Pelletier and his orchestra. You could hear ”Special Streaking” on Funky Flea comp., and now you can taste entire lp of cool funky instro/lounge dedicated to runnin’ nude maniacs. Hello Streakers!

THE FLEE-REKKERS – Joe Meek’s Fabulous Flee-Rekkers [60’s Instros]

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”The Flee-Rekkers were a sax-led unit with a full, aggressive sound. The spelling of their name was never consistent. The group was named after their leader, Peter Fleerackers, whose father was Dutch. On the Triumph pressings of their first single, this became “Flee-Rakkers”, which evolved into “Flee-Rekkers” when they moved to the Pye label. The Flee-Rekkers were probably the first instrumental group recorded by Joe Meek in his studio on Holloway Road and their first record, “Green Jeans” (an adaptation of Greensleeves) was released on Meek’s own, short-lived Triumph label. Acute problems arising from the inability to press sufficient copies and distribute them adequately meant that “Green Jeans” stalled at # 23 in the charts, where it had a 13-week run, from May until August 1960. When Triumph folded, the record was reissued by Top Rank, which also went into liquidation, before it was taken over by EMI. Notwithstanding this bad luck, the group went on to cut six collectable singles and an EP on Pye/Piccadilly, but they would not enter the charts again.”

 

Flee-Rekkers C

”Apart from Fleerackers, who played tenor sax, the group consisted of Dave Cameron (lead guitar), Alan Monger (rhythm guitar, occasionally baritone sax), Doug Henning (bass), Derek Skinner (drums, soon replaced by Mickey Waller) and a second tenor sax player, Elmy Durrant. Fleerackers liked the Johnny and the Hurricanes sound, whilst Cameron was a great Duane Eddy fan. These were the main influences of the group, though on some recordings they also remind me of the Piltdown Men, another group with twin saxes out front. Their material was a mix of original compositions, old folk tunes in the public domain and covers of little-known instrumentals, like “Stage To Cimarron” by Santo and Johnny. The Flees turned professional after being discovered in West London’s “Hive of Jive” Putney Ballroom. They toured Britain extensively during the period 1960-1963. By all accounts they were a wild live act. Joe Meek certainly managed to capture the group’s pulsating sound in his studio. As usual with his liberal use of echo, reverb, compression, distortion and other unusual effects, he was able to make the group sound even more full-blooded. “Fireball” was the Flee-Rekkers’ final single in 1963. The group broke up after a summer season at Blackpool in August 1963.” [This Is My Story]

Discography:

Triumph RGM 1008 – Green Jeans / You Are My Sunshine (4/60)
Top Rank JAR 431 – Green Jeans / You Are My Sunshine (8/60)
Pye N 15288 – Sunday Date / Shiftless Sam (9/60)
Pye N 15326 – Blue Tango / Bitter Rice (2/61)
Piccadilly N 35006 – Lone Rider / Miller Like Wow! (6/61)
Piccadilly N 35048 – Stage to Cimarron / Twistin’ the Chestnuts (5/62)
Piccadilly N 35081 – Sunburst / Black Buffalo (10/62)
Piccadilly N 35109 – Fireball / Fandango (2/63)
Pye NEP 24141 – The Fabulous Flee-Rekkers (5/61)
(Isle Of Capri / Brer Robert / Hangover / P.F.B.)
Pye Records ‎PYEP 2048 – X-L-5 (Fireball) (1963)

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Solid collection of 45’s by these Joe Meek’s instro rockers influenced by Duane Eddy, The Champs and stuff, recorded from 1960-63. Check-em out! Gid!!!