TEENAGE REPRESSION [Wyld 50’s/Early 60’s Rockabilly Obscurities]

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‘Young And Wild, That’s my style, that’s me!”

Woah dad! This one is GRRREEAT! Wicked collection of mostly late 50’s obcure rockabilly & wyld rockers compiled by famous French EVA rec. label. Here ya got some well known killer tunes like The Wailers – Dirty Robber, Robert Williams – Loud Mufflers, The Crestones – She’s A Bad Motorcycle, The Elite – One Potato, you could hear on some famous garage comps, but you must check out other favs as Darrel Rhodes – Four O’clock Baby, Mel Dorsey – Little Lip, John & Jackie – Little Girl, The Blue Echoes – It’s Witchcraft, Bob Vidone – Untrue, Al Hendrix – Young & Wild… This is better than my previous ”Rampage!” post. Don’t miss it, Dig!!!

 

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RAMPAGE! 17 Full-Throttled Rockers!

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A real cool vinyl compilation of obscure late 50s to early 60s raw Rock ‘N’ Roll. From Atomic Passion label that gave you killer ”Teenage Riot!” and ”Blowin’ Through Yokohama!” comps. Dig the RAMPAGE!

 

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THE CUB KODA CRAZY SHOW [50’s/60’s R&B / R’n’R]

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Back in 1965, I lost my radio in an explosion. Yep. It just BLEW UP on the patio, just as Sonny Bono was whining-out “I Got You Babe.” Man, it was weird. No shit; this really happened. Smoke came out and everything. Now I realize it was an omen – soon FM formats would suck up the Holy Spirit of cool radio and snuff out the pilot light that was true rock & roll. For years, I’ve offered up my rhythm-horny ears as sacrificial lambs to something – ANYTHING – that could justify my owning a radio. (Heck, if it weren’t for baseball, my squawk box woulda gotten the old heave-ho ages ago.) Then, one day I heard the news…
IT’S TWELVE O’CLOCK
MIDNIGHT AND IT’S
TIME TO HOWL!
This eekin’ beacon was reekin’ with the same sonic earblasts that had once transformed a handful of plastic wires and transistors into a secondary heart. And who, disguised as Cub Koda, wild-mannered DJ for a 50,000 watter, fights a never ending battle for the truth, justice, and the American way, jumpin’, shoutin’, and gigglin’ through platters, chatters, and all that matters? Yesiree Bobalu, it’s the same Cubby the K we know and love as the “Vinyl Junkie” in his GOLDMINE mag column, and the same ol’ boy whose wax (fromhis teen pud combo the Del Tinos to his current rockaroonie blooz boy shenanigans to his shiny gold disc days of Brownsville Station and “Gropin’ In the Girls’ Room”) ranks him right up there with… um, lemme see… Nervous Norvus? Yep! And now right here in the nifty fifty we got us one dee-fried and bona fida Moondog blastin’ a regular riot known as THE BIG DISC JOCKEY SHOW IN THE SKY! But hey, this hi-fidelity shin-dig now knows no bounds, ‘cause plucked rip and ready from outta those high frequency ozone-rippin’ airwaves above our heads is a microgroove pancake featuring the Cubmaster hisself roarin’ and growlin’ and preachin’ and teachin’ and celebratin’ the advent of electricity like he’d been struck by lightning!
Ah, relief at last – an aural antidote to Sonny Bono!

Dive in and dig!
Billy Miller
KICKS MAGAZINE, USA

 

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ELVIS PRESLEY – I Was The One [1983] Vinyl Rip!

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Yes, he was. This lp collection is one of the first Elvis slabs I bought and it’s interesting for great sound enchanced by new remix. Some says these are late 70’s re-recordings of ‘Kings’ classic tunes but I’m not sure. What I know is that this is cool collection with great sound quality so even if you’re feelin’ overstuffed with Elvis stuff check this one anyway. Vinyl rip by Surfadelic. Dig!!!

 

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JOHNNY CARROLL – Texabilly [1978]

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“This 18-track collection brings together Johnny Carroll’s entire output for collector Ronny Weiser’s Rollin’ Rock label, recorded between 1974 and 1977. Chronologically beginning with the tribute tip of the hat on “Gene Vincent Rock” from 1974 (although it’s not sequenced that way on the disc), featuring original Fabulous Thunderbirds drummer Mike Buck, the bulk of this disc comprises the entire 1997 Texabilly album. This minor classic of the idiom was cut in Weiser’s living room in one marathon 27-hour session and featured fellow Texan rocker Ray Campi on slappin’ string bass. Carroll’s voice is full of the same sore-throated hollering power that he possessed in his 1950s prime, and his guitar work is funky in tone and simplistic in derivation. The big surprise is the preponderance of original material, most of it coming from Carroll’s pen, with “Who’s to Say,” “Is It Easy to Be Easy,” “Her Throbbing Lips,” and “Whatcha Gonna Do?” being particular standouts. The 1970s were barren years for the original rockers, and the rockabilly revival hadn’t built up a full head of steam yet, but these recordings helped to show that there was still plenty of energy left in the genre and one of its original practitioners.” [Cub Koda]

More rockabilly action at Surfadelic. By the way, did you know that ‘People In Texas Like To Dance’, well they do alright! Dig!!!

 

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CHARLIE FEATHERS – Charlie Feathers / Honky Tonk Man & New Jungle Fever [1987-90]

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Allright folks, more Charlie’s ‘Feathersbilly’ is on the way. These late 80’s recordings are pretty solid R-Billy/Country stuff, especially self titled ’91 lp, but you gotta check it out yourself. Dig!!!

”S/t Lp recorded in 1990 and produced by Ben Vaughn, features Feathers doing a number of his own truly eccentric and brilliant songs accompanied by former Sun Studios musicians guitarist Roland James, drummer James Van Eaton, and bassist Stan Kesler, and an alternate rhythm section on a few other cuts provided by bassist Terry Bailey and drummer (as well as cardboard-box percussionist) Perry York. Of the Feathers “classics” that appear here are “Pardon Me Mister,” “A Man in Love,” “A Long Time Ago,” and a rewrite of “I Can’t Remember to Forget,” dedicated to Presley, who first cut the song as “We Can’t Seem to Remember to Forget.” Other material includes rockabilly nuggets like “Fraulein,” “Mean Woman Blues,” “Uh Huh Honey,” and Stan Kesler’s true gem, “You’re Right, I’m Left, She’s Gone.” Instrumentation aside — all the playing here is expert, authentic, and full of raw immediacy — it’s Feathers’ voice that is the spark and spook of these proceedings. He is a man haunted by the past eternally, trying to make it a renewable present, and offering the truth in how forgotten it all is in his delivery (check out “Defrost Your Heart,” in which Feathers moans, growls, does the hillbilly wail, and sings a blues that is truly unearthly in that same way that Hank Williams and Roscoe Holcomb’s are). Feathers died in the late ’90s, but he leaves behind an enduring testament to his particular brilliance as a frighteningly intense singer and canny songwriter. This album is near the pinnacle of that legacy.” [Thom Jurek]

 

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“I could talk about Charlie Feathers ’til I’m blue in the face, but there is no way to explain his greatness. He is completely unique. You have to hear him to get the picture.
In the 50s, he was one of the people who invented and defined Rock’n’Roll. In the 80s, he’s still inventing and defining it. He seems to have only gotten stranger and more perverse through the years. He baby-talks, chirps, hiccups, moans, and gasps his way through a song, ’til it becomes a little separate world all it’s own.
His version of “Roll Over Beethoven” is so full of menacing weirdness, it sounds like a song you never heard before.
Charlie is a crazy magician and he knows all the tricks. But don’t take my word for it. Buy this record.” – Lux Interior

 

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”Depending on who you ask, Charlie Feathers was either one of the great stylists of rockabilly or one of the true raving lunatics of the genre, and of course the qualities which inspired these judgments were in no way mutually exclusive. While Feathers’ voice was capable of gracefully recreating all the trademark swoops, gulps and wails of classic rockabilly, he refused to be hemmed in by the conventions of the style; he could sing straight country in a manner that would make George Jones cry with envy, or he could let loose with guttural blues moaning that was positively lascivious — and he would sometimes do a bit of both while making his way through something like “Working on a Building,” as he does on this two EP’s cut in the 1980s. Both Honky Tonk Man and New Jungle Fever were obviously recorded quickly on a low budget, and the production and accompaniment on these tracks leaves a great deal to be desired, but Feathers wails like a man possessed from front to back on this collection, even if he does sound as if he may have enjoyed a few too many cocktails as he throws shouts, squeals and whoops right and left like a boxer raining blows on a target he can’t quite see. This material doesn’t show Feathers at the top of his game, but despite the reduced circumstances of his career, these tracks find him full of fire and sonically unrepentant. His full-on covers of “Honky Tonk Man,” “Blue Suede Shoes” and “He’ll Have to Go” (the latter sounding like the weirdest pick-up line ever set to music) and gotta-hear-’em-to-believe-’em originals like “Jungle Fever” and “Who Da Say” were crafted by some sort of mutant visionary, and this is the work of a great lunatic stylist if there ever was such a thing.” [Mark Deming]

 

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CHARLIE FEATHERS – Jungle Fever / Uh Huh Honey [Hiccup Rockabilly Legend]

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“I’m a tip-top daddy and I’m gonna have my way
Keep away from the corners is what I got to say
With a-one hand only, get a-ready for a ride
Give me one hand loose and I’ll be satisfied”

“Charlie grew up in rural North Mississippi and was taught guitar by his friend, Junior Kimbrough, before heading off to nearby Memphis in 1950 with a view to making it in the music business. He should have been massive, being one of Sam Phillips‘ first white signing to Sun Records, writing some great songs and having (arguably) an even better ‘stage’ name than Elvis Presley, who he soon be-friended. Sadly, it was not to be, as even though he recorded regularly for Sun and other labels such as Meteor, Kay, King and more, a mix of bad luck, poor decision-making and an impatient personality all contributed to a life among the also-rans and nearly-men. The notes to this set suggest that it may also have been that, despite his instinctive and natural feel for rockabilly, his distinctive ‘hiccupy’ vocal delivery was too pure for mass consumption”

Give me a free hand baby, ’cause I wanna rock
Turn me loose and maybe I will blow my top
Give me a free hand woman, let it swing by my side
Just give me one hand loose and I’ll be satisfied
Turn loose! Oh, turn loose!”

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“I can’t hardly stand it
You’re troublin’ me
I can’t hardly stand
It just can’t be…”

His name is most frequently associated with the classics that regularly appear on the best rockabilly compilations – Tongue-Tied Jill, Everybody’s Lovin’ My Baby, Bottle To The BabyOne Hand Loose, Get With It and, of course, Can’t Hardly Stand It [made famous by Born Bad, Songs We Taught The Cramps comps.]

Jungle Fever” LP is essential collection of Charlie’s 50’s R-billy and country rock stuff and it’s a must have. “Uh Huh Honey” thought not so important comp. as ‘Fever’ brings together all of his late-’60s recordings for the Memphis-based Philwood label, along with some fascinating live TV recordings from 1978. has some real cool trax as The Wild Side Of Life, Do You Know, Rain (Where’s She at Tonight), Long Time Ago, and others. Classic uncontrolled Feathersbilly. Great rockabilly from a true legend!

“Well, it’s rain-rain-rain it keeps on falling
Upon my window pane tonight
Though our love is even colder
Still wonder where she’s at tonight…”

 

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“Well, feel the rhythm in your bones and you know how I feel
But don’t you grab me close baby, this time is for real
Get ready for some rockin’, pick ’em up and put ’em down
Give me one hand loose and I’ll be satisfied”

 

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Tip Top Daddy – The Ultimate Rockabilly God!

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TOOTER BOATMAN – The Tooter Boatman Sound / In Person [Rare 50’s Rockabilly]

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”Hear that thunder and lightning
Raining on through the night
Feel that cool wind blowing
The moon’s gone out of sight
Darkness all around us
Darkness everywhere
I’m a-gonna wanna hold you a-baby
And you don’t want me near”

More Tooter 50’s recordings in these two ’84/’85 White Label Lp comps. Life Begins At 4 O’clock, They Won’t Let Me In, Wayward Wind, Depression Blues, Who That … and other rare stuff with studio chats, rehearsals, false starts and alternate versions. For R-billy enthusiasts and others. Dig!

”Well, hear that big wheel rolling
Rolling on down the line
Vibration of sensation
Man, when her lips meet mine…”

Tooter Boatman Fans Only

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