ELVIS PRESLEY – I Was The One [1983] Vinyl Rip!

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Yes, he was. This lp collection is one of the first Elvis slabs I bought and it’s interesting for great sound enchanced by new remix. Some says these are late 70’s re-recordings of ‘Kings’ classic tunes but I’m not sure. What I know is that this is cool collection with great sound quality so even if you’re feelin’ overstuffed with Elvis stuff check this one anyway. Vinyl rip by Surfadelic. Dig!!!

 

Elvis Presley - I Was The One3ELVIS_PRESLEY_I+WAS+THE+ONE-520171b

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JOHNNY CARROLL – Texabilly [1978]

Johnny Carroll 1

 

“This 18-track collection brings together Johnny Carroll’s entire output for collector Ronny Weiser’s Rollin’ Rock label, recorded between 1974 and 1977. Chronologically beginning with the tribute tip of the hat on “Gene Vincent Rock” from 1974 (although it’s not sequenced that way on the disc), featuring original Fabulous Thunderbirds drummer Mike Buck, the bulk of this disc comprises the entire 1997 Texabilly album. This minor classic of the idiom was cut in Weiser’s living room in one marathon 27-hour session and featured fellow Texan rocker Ray Campi on slappin’ string bass. Carroll’s voice is full of the same sore-throated hollering power that he possessed in his 1950s prime, and his guitar work is funky in tone and simplistic in derivation. The big surprise is the preponderance of original material, most of it coming from Carroll’s pen, with “Who’s to Say,” “Is It Easy to Be Easy,” “Her Throbbing Lips,” and “Whatcha Gonna Do?” being particular standouts. The 1970s were barren years for the original rockers, and the rockabilly revival hadn’t built up a full head of steam yet, but these recordings helped to show that there was still plenty of energy left in the genre and one of its original practitioners.” [Cub Koda]

More rockabilly action at Surfadelic. By the way, did you know that ‘People In Texas Like To Dance’, well they do alright! Dig!!!

 

Johnny Carroll 2

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CHARLIE FEATHERS – Charlie Feathers / Honky Tonk Man & New Jungle Fever [1987-90]

charlie feathers--1

 

Allright folks, more Charlie’s ‘Feathersbilly’ is on the way. These late 80’s recordings are pretty solid R-Billy/Country stuff, especially self titled ’91 lp, but you gotta check it out yourself. Dig!!!

”S/t Lp recorded in 1990 and produced by Ben Vaughn, features Feathers doing a number of his own truly eccentric and brilliant songs accompanied by former Sun Studios musicians guitarist Roland James, drummer James Van Eaton, and bassist Stan Kesler, and an alternate rhythm section on a few other cuts provided by bassist Terry Bailey and drummer (as well as cardboard-box percussionist) Perry York. Of the Feathers “classics” that appear here are “Pardon Me Mister,” “A Man in Love,” “A Long Time Ago,” and a rewrite of “I Can’t Remember to Forget,” dedicated to Presley, who first cut the song as “We Can’t Seem to Remember to Forget.” Other material includes rockabilly nuggets like “Fraulein,” “Mean Woman Blues,” “Uh Huh Honey,” and Stan Kesler’s true gem, “You’re Right, I’m Left, She’s Gone.” Instrumentation aside — all the playing here is expert, authentic, and full of raw immediacy — it’s Feathers’ voice that is the spark and spook of these proceedings. He is a man haunted by the past eternally, trying to make it a renewable present, and offering the truth in how forgotten it all is in his delivery (check out “Defrost Your Heart,” in which Feathers moans, growls, does the hillbilly wail, and sings a blues that is truly unearthly in that same way that Hank Williams and Roscoe Holcomb’s are). Feathers died in the late ’90s, but he leaves behind an enduring testament to his particular brilliance as a frighteningly intense singer and canny songwriter. This album is near the pinnacle of that legacy.” [Thom Jurek]

 

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“I could talk about Charlie Feathers ’til I’m blue in the face, but there is no way to explain his greatness. He is completely unique. You have to hear him to get the picture.
In the 50s, he was one of the people who invented and defined Rock’n’Roll. In the 80s, he’s still inventing and defining it. He seems to have only gotten stranger and more perverse through the years. He baby-talks, chirps, hiccups, moans, and gasps his way through a song, ’til it becomes a little separate world all it’s own.
His version of “Roll Over Beethoven” is so full of menacing weirdness, it sounds like a song you never heard before.
Charlie is a crazy magician and he knows all the tricks. But don’t take my word for it. Buy this record.” – Lux Interior

 

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”Depending on who you ask, Charlie Feathers was either one of the great stylists of rockabilly or one of the true raving lunatics of the genre, and of course the qualities which inspired these judgments were in no way mutually exclusive. While Feathers’ voice was capable of gracefully recreating all the trademark swoops, gulps and wails of classic rockabilly, he refused to be hemmed in by the conventions of the style; he could sing straight country in a manner that would make George Jones cry with envy, or he could let loose with guttural blues moaning that was positively lascivious — and he would sometimes do a bit of both while making his way through something like “Working on a Building,” as he does on this two EP’s cut in the 1980s. Both Honky Tonk Man and New Jungle Fever were obviously recorded quickly on a low budget, and the production and accompaniment on these tracks leaves a great deal to be desired, but Feathers wails like a man possessed from front to back on this collection, even if he does sound as if he may have enjoyed a few too many cocktails as he throws shouts, squeals and whoops right and left like a boxer raining blows on a target he can’t quite see. This material doesn’t show Feathers at the top of his game, but despite the reduced circumstances of his career, these tracks find him full of fire and sonically unrepentant. His full-on covers of “Honky Tonk Man,” “Blue Suede Shoes” and “He’ll Have to Go” (the latter sounding like the weirdest pick-up line ever set to music) and gotta-hear-’em-to-believe-’em originals like “Jungle Fever” and “Who Da Say” were crafted by some sort of mutant visionary, and this is the work of a great lunatic stylist if there ever was such a thing.” [Mark Deming]

 

charlie-feathers-honky-tonk-man-2-cdCharlie Feathers - Honky Tonk 1charlie-feathers-last-call-cd

 

CHARLIE FEATHERS – Jungle Fever / Uh Huh Honey [Hiccup Rockabilly Legend]

Charlie Feathers - Jungle Fever 1

“I’m a tip-top daddy and I’m gonna have my way
Keep away from the corners is what I got to say
With a-one hand only, get a-ready for a ride
Give me one hand loose and I’ll be satisfied”

“Charlie grew up in rural North Mississippi and was taught guitar by his friend, Junior Kimbrough, before heading off to nearby Memphis in 1950 with a view to making it in the music business. He should have been massive, being one of Sam Phillips‘ first white signing to Sun Records, writing some great songs and having (arguably) an even better ‘stage’ name than Elvis Presley, who he soon be-friended. Sadly, it was not to be, as even though he recorded regularly for Sun and other labels such as Meteor, Kay, King and more, a mix of bad luck, poor decision-making and an impatient personality all contributed to a life among the also-rans and nearly-men. The notes to this set suggest that it may also have been that, despite his instinctive and natural feel for rockabilly, his distinctive ‘hiccupy’ vocal delivery was too pure for mass consumption”

Give me a free hand baby, ’cause I wanna rock
Turn me loose and maybe I will blow my top
Give me a free hand woman, let it swing by my side
Just give me one hand loose and I’ll be satisfied
Turn loose! Oh, turn loose!”

Charlie Feathers - Jungle Fever 2

“I can’t hardly stand it
You’re troublin’ me
I can’t hardly stand
It just can’t be…”

His name is most frequently associated with the classics that regularly appear on the best rockabilly compilations – Tongue-Tied Jill, Everybody’s Lovin’ My Baby, Bottle To The BabyOne Hand Loose, Get With It and, of course, Can’t Hardly Stand It [made famous by Born Bad, Songs We Taught The Cramps comps.]

Jungle Fever” LP is essential collection of Charlie’s 50’s R-billy and country rock stuff and it’s a must have. “Uh Huh Honey” thought not so important comp. as ‘Fever’ brings together all of his late-’60s recordings for the Memphis-based Philwood label, along with some fascinating live TV recordings from 1978. has some real cool trax as The Wild Side Of Life, Do You Know, Rain (Where’s She at Tonight), Long Time Ago, and others. Classic uncontrolled Feathersbilly. Great rockabilly from a true legend!

“Well, it’s rain-rain-rain it keeps on falling
Upon my window pane tonight
Though our love is even colder
Still wonder where she’s at tonight…”

 

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“Well, feel the rhythm in your bones and you know how I feel
But don’t you grab me close baby, this time is for real
Get ready for some rockin’, pick ’em up and put ’em down
Give me one hand loose and I’ll be satisfied”

 

Charlie Feathers _1_002

Tip Top Daddy – The Ultimate Rockabilly God!

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TOOTER BOATMAN – The Tooter Boatman Sound / In Person [Rare 50’s Rockabilly]

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”Hear that thunder and lightning
Raining on through the night
Feel that cool wind blowing
The moon’s gone out of sight
Darkness all around us
Darkness everywhere
I’m a-gonna wanna hold you a-baby
And you don’t want me near”

More Tooter 50’s recordings in these two ’84/’85 White Label Lp comps. Life Begins At 4 O’clock, They Won’t Let Me In, Wayward Wind, Depression Blues, Who That … and other rare stuff with studio chats, rehearsals, false starts and alternate versions. For R-billy enthusiasts and others. Dig!

”Well, hear that big wheel rolling
Rolling on down the line
Vibration of sensation
Man, when her lips meet mine…”

Tooter Boatman Fans Only

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TOOTER BOATMAN – Tooter Boatman And Friends [Rare 50’s Rockabilly]

BenQ DC S1410

 

“Tooter Boatman was a Texas rocker who recorded prolifically between 1957 and 1963, but only a handful of recordings were issued during his too short life. In 1957 he formed his own rock and roll group, the Chapparals. Towards the end of 1957 they made their first record, “Poor Gal”/“Sweet Lies” (Rebel 108), which was credited to The Chaparrals. It was recorded at the Clifford Herring studio in Fort Worth, but after Danny Wolfe opened his own studio in Stephensville, Boatman and his group would hold almost all their sessions there. Danny Wolfe, a good friend of Tooter, was a songwriter / singer / pianist who went on to write most of their material. Wolfe’s songs have also been recorded by many other artists, including Gene Vincent, John D. Loudermilk, Pat Boone, Huelyn Duvall and Sanford Clark. Wolfe became the manager of the Chapparals and booked them in clubs and on TV shows all over Texas.

TOOTER BOATMAN

The second release was the one for which Boatman is best known. “The Will of Love” was released in April 1958 on Twinkle 501, coupled with “More and More (I Love You)”. Several sources claim that “The Will of Love” was coupled with “Thunder and Lightning” (another rockabilly classic from the pen of Danny Wolfe), but these two songs were not coupled until 1972, when they were issued on a UK repro single (Injun 108). On August 1, 1964, Boatman’s life came to an abrupt end. A hit and run driver killed Tooter and his close friend Tom Putt on a lonely country road in California.” [rockabilly.nl]

Cool, previously unissued 50’s stuff by this Texas r-billy cat on White Label records lp comp. from 1983. Already have posted it on my old blog and here it is again. Vinyl rip by Mr.Eliminator. Dig!!!

BenQ DC S1410BenQ DC S1410

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LEVI DEXTER & STEVE HOOKER – Rockabilly Dolls [2011]

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”Steve Hooker hails from Southend-on-Sea, Essex in the UK. He is best known for his stagecraft as guitarman for garage trashers The Shakers, Morrissey and Polecats mainman Boz’s Bozmen, rockabilly trio Rumble and record nuggets with Feelgood and Blockhead Wilko Johnson and Demented Are Go’s; Captain Drugbuster. He has shared stages with Mr Maybellene; Chuck Berry, New York Doll – Johnny Thunders, Loveless star Robert Gordon and toured relentlessly since the 70’s throughout Europe and across to New York and Japan.”

 

Steve Hooker

Steve Hooker

 

‘Rockabilly Dolls’ as tittle suggest is best to describe as a mix of r-billy and NY Doll – Johnny Thunders sounds, so it must be real cool allright. There are even two Thunders covers ‘Downtown‘ and ‘Blame It On Mom‘. UK r’n’r/punk veteran Steve Hooker on guit with r-billy ”Idol” Levi Dexter on vocals proved as a winning combination. If you’re a Johnny Thunders or rockabilly fan don’t miss this. Check some favs down there. Special bonus trax included, Dig!!!

 

levi dexter & steve hooker=rockabilly dolls

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VINCE TAYLOR – Jet Black Leather Machine [50s/60s R-Billy]

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”Who was Vince Taylor? For one, he was the inspiration behind David Bowie’s Ziggy Stardust. He also wrote one of the great Rock songs of all time, “Brand New Cadillac” (most famously covered by The Clash off their 1979 opus, London Calling). Granted, stylistically he owed a huge debt to his heroes, Elvis Presely, Gene Vincent & Eddie Cochran. And while not the most original Rocker on the scene, he did trademark the black leather suit before any of them. Of course, at the height of his popularity, just as he was about to break through, he notoriously “lost it” onstage. Apparently, the acid he allegedly scored off of Bob Dylan was part of the reason he wrapped a towel around his head, proclaimed himself Jesus Christ & preached to the crowd before trashing his band’s gear Who-style.”

 

 

”All that said, in terms of the material there aren’t alot of originals like “Brand New Cadilliac”. In fact, a case could be argued that the likes of Chuck Berry, Eddie Cochran & Gene Vincent laid down the definitive versions of many of the songs herein. What sets Vince Taylor apart however is not the material he covered, but how he did it. In terms of intensity, attack & edge, this is some of the most ferocious Rockbilly around. We’ve all heard “Long Tall Sally” a thousand times, but not with this kind of abandon.

The French praised him for his feral wildness onstage & listening to the likes of “Cadillac”, “Jet Black Leather Machine” & “Since My Baby Left Me”, it was no myth. Other standouts include a stellar “Jezebel” & “Hi Heeled Sneakers”. Also noteworthy is the eerie, “Endless Sleep” .

As for “Cold White & Beautiful”, granted singing an upbeat song about your baby shooting herself is not going to be a guaranteed hit, but the jauntiness of this rare B-side is likely to send a chill up your spine. As will no doubt, Taylor’s performances throughout.” [LEPER MESSIAH]

 

Jet Black Leather Machine 2

Jet Black Leather Machine 3

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RUMBLE ROCK vol.1-3 [60’s Rare R-billy/Garage Rockers]

Rumble Rock Vol.1aRumble Rock Vol.2a

Rumble Rock Vol. 3

 

Ultra Low-Fi Rockers! Wild guitar actions! Insane-Kickin’ Ass Rockers!

Well alright! Here’s a vinyl comp. series of some sloppy, dirty, drunken, undisciplined 60s rockers [mostly uncomped]. Here you gotta deal with some rare, obscure R-billy, C.Berry influenced R’n’R , few mid 60s garage & R&B rockers and instrumentals. It’s kinda like now legendary ”Greasy Rock’n’Roll” comp. series. Below are some of my favs you can check out. Now ya know what a fuss is all about. It’s about RUMBLE !!!

 

 

 

DEAN CARTER vs STUD COLE [60’s Garage/Psychobilly/Blues]

Dean Carter - Call Of The Wild !!

”Dean Carter was a true oddity of ’60s rock. He was a singer-guitarist with the heart and much of the sound of a ’50s rockabilly wildman, yet he recorded music that updated that rockabilly spirit with ’60s garage rock and dashes of soul, and even a bit of psychedelia here and there. Carter didn’t put out a whole lot of records in the ’60s, and those he did put out were heard by few. Yet one of those singles in particular, 1967’s “Jailhouse Rock”/”Rebel Woman” (on the small Milky Way label), is highly valued by ’60s garage collectors, even if its rockabilly influence made it a little anachronistic. Carter also did a good deal of unreleased sessions of considerable quality, whether he was playing relatively straight rockabilly or his freakier hybrid of rockabilly with late-’60s sounds. Much material from those sessions came to light on the fine Big Beat 2002 CD release Call of the Wild.

Dean Carter

Carter was born Arlie Neaville and began playing rockabilly in the late ’50s in Champaign, IL, where he remained based for much of the ’60s. He recorded for the Ping label in 1961 under his real name, on the more established Fraternity label in 1962 as Arlie Nevil, and then for Limelight as Dean Carter in 1964. That same year, he and Arlie Miller, a member of his band the Lucky Ones, started a home studio in Danville, IL to record both Carter and other musicians. The pair also ran the small Milky Way label, which released product by Carter and others. At times the sessions got pretty strange even by garage rock standards, with ukulele, accordion, dobro, and clarinet all heard in addition to the usual crunchy guitars on his outrageous cover of Elvis Presley’s “Jailhouse Rock.”

Dean Carter - Wild!

Carter went to the West Coast for a while in the late ’60s, recording a couple of singles in Washington State with Gene Vincent guitarist Jerry Merritt, for Merritt’s Tell International label. He returned to the Midwest at the end of the decade to resume recording with Miller, and went back to billing himself as Arlie Neaville on record. In the early ’70s, he went into gospel music, where he’s remained ever since.” [allmusic]

 

Stud Cole

”He’s been described as “Jack Starr meets Johnny Kidd”, “a lysergic Conway Twitty” and “Elvis fronting the ’66 Yardbirds” but mere words can’t truly describe the unique sounds of the late, great Stud Cole!”

””The late, great Stud Cole’s 1968 promo only LP (only 100 copies made in 1968) with five bonus cuts gives Los Angeles’ ultimate loner icon a fitting tribute as his memory is perceived in the digital age. Starting off with the title track, Cole’s Burn Baby Burn sounds timeless, a welcomed escape from the modern glut of over produced, emotion-deprived recordings. Cole’s fusion of 60’s rock and gritty country still sounds years ahead of its time, his seductive singing style alluring, its tough boy approach fitting for the rock and country he creates.” [Alex Steininger]

”Lounge flavored garage, with rock-a-billy influences, Elvis-like vocals, and fuzz guitar, all over blues/psych mat’l. This is one unusual album, originally issued as a demo only in 1968. The artist’s real name was Pat Tirone, and he was a bartender from L.A.”

 

 

What to say about those two wyldmen weirdos of Rock’n’Roll? It’s a double dose of 60’s garage, r-billy/blues/psych lunacy and mayhem the way it shoulda be… or what? Anyways, I’ve already have posted these real cool cats, two wacko garage surfadelic favs and I do it again. If you like acts as Hasil Adkins and The Cramps this is for you. And yeah, check this one too – Kookie Cook [a friend of Dean Carter] Burn Baby Burn!